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On Freezing Depositor Funds at Financially Distressed Banks: An Experimental Analysis

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  • DOUGLAS D. DAVIS
  • ROBERT J. REILLY

Abstract

This article reports an experiment conducted to evaluate the effects of alterations in the terms of repayments to depositors following a liquidity suspension, as well as the effect of alterations in the publicity of information about withdrawal behavior on the fragility of distressed banks. Results indicate that a “tough” renegotiation stance of protecting depositors who maintain their money in the bank, can quite effectively promote stability. Information provided to depositors regarding past withdrawal behavior weakens the effectiveness of a tough renegotiation policy but reduces fragility somewhat for a more lenient rescheduling condition.

Suggested Citation

  • Douglas D. Davis & Robert J. Reilly, 2016. "On Freezing Depositor Funds at Financially Distressed Banks: An Experimental Analysis," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 48(5), pages 989-1017, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:wly:jmoncb:v:48:y:2016:i:5:p:989-1017
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1111/jmcb.12324
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:ecolet:v:162:y:2018:i:c:p:146-149 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Maria Semenova, 2018. "A Bank Run in a Classroom: Do Smart Depositors Withdraw on Time?," HSE Working papers WP BRP 64/FE/2018, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    3. Kiss, Hubert J. & Rodriguez-Lara, Ismael & Rosa-Garcia, Alfonso, 2018. "Panic bank runs," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 162(C), pages 146-149.
      • Hubert Janos Kiss & Ismael Rodriguez-Lara & Alfonso Rosa-Garcia, 2017. "Panic bank runs," IEHAS Discussion Papers 1710, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • C9 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments

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