IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/lie/wpaper/86.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Productivity-Enhancing Reallocation during the Great Recession:Evidence from Lithuania

Author

Listed:
  • Linas Tarasonis

    (Bank of Lithuania, Vilnius University)

  • Jose Garcia-Louzao

    (Bank of Lithuania)

Abstract

This paper studies the impact of the Great Recession on the relationship between reallocation and productivity dynamics in Lithuania. Using detailed microlevel data, we first document the aggregate contribution of firm exit and employment reallocation to productivity growth. Next, we estimate firm-level regressions to confirm the findings and to perform a heterogeneity analysis. This analysis shows that productivity shielded firms from exit, and that this relationship became stronger during the Great Recession. Moreover, we demonstrate that more productive firms experienced on average lower employment losses, and that this effect was even stronger during the economic slump. Taken together, our results suggest that reallocation was productivityenhancing during the Great Recession. However, the analysis also indicates that reallocation intensity varied with sector's dependence on external financing or international trade as well as market concentration.

Suggested Citation

  • Linas Tarasonis & Jose Garcia-Louzao, 2021. "Productivity-Enhancing Reallocation during the Great Recession:Evidence from Lithuania," Bank of Lithuania Working Paper Series 86, Bank of Lithuania.
  • Handle: RePEc:lie:wpaper:86
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://www.lb.lt/uploads/publications/docs/28762_625fe7987f358a7a9c904db365fa14de.pdf
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Carlos Casacuberta & Néstor Gandelman, 2012. "Protection, Openness, and Factor Adjustment: Evidence from the Manufacturing Sector in Uruguay," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 60(3), pages 597-629.
    2. Carlos Carreira & Paulino Teixeira, 2016. "Entry and exit in severe recessions: lessons from the 2008–2013 Portuguese economic crisis," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 46(4), pages 591-617, April.
    3. Bartelsman, Eric & Lopez-Garcia, Paloma & Presidente, Giorgio, 2018. "Cyclical and structural variation in resource allocation: evidence for Europe," Working Paper Series 2210, European Central Bank.
    4. De Gregorio, Jose & Giovannini, Alberto & Wolf, Holger C., 1994. "International evidence on tradables and nontradables inflation," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 1225-1244, June.
    5. Sophie Osotimehin & Francesco Pappadà, 2017. "Credit Frictions and The Cleansing Effect of Recessions," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 127(602), pages 1153-1187, June.
    6. Mihnea Constantinescu & Aurelija Proskute, 2018. "Firm heterogeneity and macroeconomic dynamics: a datadriven investigation," Bank of Lithuania Discussion Paper Series 7, Bank of Lithuania.
    7. Gabriele Rovigatti & Vincenzo Mollisi, 2018. "Theory and practice of total-factor productivity estimation: The control function approach using Stata," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 18(3), pages 618-662, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Manuchehr Irandoust, 2017. "Symmetry, proportionality and productivity bias hypothesis: evidence from panel-VAR models," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 50(1), pages 79-93, February.
    2. Takatoshi Ito & Peter Isard & Steven Symansky, 1999. "Economic Growth and Real Exchange Rate: An Overview of the Balassa-Samuelson Hypothesis in Asia," NBER Chapters, in: Changes in Exchange Rates in Rapidly Developing Countries: Theory, Practice, and Policy Issues, pages 109-132, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Couharde, Cécile & Delatte, Anne-Laure & Grekou, Carl & Mignon, Valérie & Morvillier, Florian, 2020. "Measuring the Balassa-Samuelson effect: A guidance note on the RPROD database," International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 161(C), pages 237-247.
    4. Menzie Chinn & Louis Johnston, 1996. "Real Exchange Rate Levels, Productivity and Demand Shocks: Evidence from a Panel of 14 Countries," NBER Working Papers 5709, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Tyrväinen, Timo, 1998. "What do we know about productivity gaps and convergence in EMU economies?," Research Discussion Papers 31/1998, Bank of Finland.
    6. Michael Funke & Jörg Rahn, 2005. "Just How Undervalued is the Chinese Renminbi?," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 28(4), pages 465-489, April.
    7. Batini, Nicoletta & Harrison, Richard & Millard, Stephen P., 2003. "Monetary policy rules for an open economy," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 27(11-12), pages 2059-2094, September.
    8. UESUGI Iichiro & HOSONO Kaoru & MIYAKAWA Daisuke & ONO Arito & UCHIDA Hirofumi, 2018. "Reallocation of Tangible Assets and Productivity," Discussion papers 18048, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    9. Philip Hans Franses & Dick van Dijk, 2006. "A simple test for PPP among traded goods," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(1-2), pages 19-27.
    10. Meier, Carsten-Patrick, 1997. "Assessing convergence to purchasing power parity: a panel study for ten OECD countries," Open Access Publications from Kiel Institute for the World Economy 1719, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    11. Rimgailaite, Ramune, 2012. "Exchange rate modelling for Lithuania and Switzerland," MPRA Paper 43451, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    12. Cristina Fernández & Roberta García & Paloma Lopez-Garcia & Benedicta Marzinotto & Roberta Serafini & Juuso Vanhala & Ladislav Wintr, 2017. "Firm growth in Europe: An overview based on the COMPNET labour module," BCL working papers 107, Central Bank of Luxembourg.
    13. Lone Christiansen & Alessandro Prati & Luca Antonio Ricci & Thierry Tressel, 2010. "External Balance in Low-Income Countries," NBER Chapters, in: NBER International Seminar on Macroeconomics 2009, pages 265-322, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Andrés Barge‐Gil & Alberto López & Ramón Núñez‐Sánchez, 2020. "Technological spillovers from multinational firms," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(12), pages 3184-3202, December.
    15. Gunther Schnabl, 2001. "Weak Economy and Strong Currency: The Origins of the Strong Yen in the 1990s," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 70(4), pages 489-503.
    16. V. Bignon & F. Boissay & C. Cahn & L.-M. Harpedanne de Belleville, 2016. "Extended eligibility of credit claims for Eurosystem refinancing Consequences for the supply of credit to companies," Quarterly selection of articles - Bulletin de la Banque de France, Banque de France, issue 43, pages 15-23, Autumn.
    17. Mukherjee, Rahul & Proebsting, Christian, 2021. "Acquirers and financial constraints: Theory and evidence from emerging markets," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 117(C).
    18. Michael Kumhof, 2002. "A Critical View of Inflation Targeting: Crises, Limited Sustaintability, and Aggregate Shocks," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series, in: Norman Loayza & Raimundo Soto & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel (Series Editor) (ed.),Inflation Targeting: Desing, Performance, Challenges, edition 1, volume 5, chapter 8, pages 349-394, Central Bank of Chile.
    19. Olivier Cardi & Romain Restout, 2011. "Fiscal shocks in a two sector open economy," Working Papers hal-00567855, HAL.
    20. Apte, Prakash & Sercu, Piet & Uppal, Raman, 2004. "The exchange rate and purchasing power parity: extending the theory and tests," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 553-571, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    firm dynamics; job reallocation; productivity; Great Recession;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • L11 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance - - - Production, Pricing, and Market Structure; Size Distribution of Firms
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:lie:wpaper:86. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/lbanklt.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Povilas Lastauskas (email available below). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/lbanklt.html .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.