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Wer arbeitet wann? Arbeitszeitarrangements von Selbständigen und abhängig Beschäftigten: Eine mikroökonometrische Analyse deutscher Zeitbudgetdaten

  • Joachim Merz
  • Derik Burgert

    ()

    (LEUPHANA University Lüneburg,Department of Economic, Behaviour and Law Sciences, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)))

In recent years new patterns of working time have appeared along with an increased flexibility concerning timing of work and the decay of the regular working day. We analyze the timing of working time for both self-employed and employees based on the German time budget study 1991/92. In the first step we systematise different courses of the working day. Thereby, four categories of working time patterns emerged. After that the question is raised if differences between self-employed and employees can be found concerning their daily working times. After a descriptive analysis of the categories a multinomial logit model is employed in order to find out if the occupational background of a person can be used to explain the decision which working time pattern to choose. We control for variables stemming from human capital theory led explanations from ‚new home economics’ and from time use research. It can be shown that particularly self-employed without any employee tend to work at non-core times such as early in the morning and/or late in the evening or in multiple episodes with at least one longer interruption.

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File URL: http://www.leuphana.de/fileadmin/user_upload/Forschungseinrichtungen/ffb/files/publikationen/diskussion/DP_45_Arbeitszeitarrangements_selbstaendigen.pdf
File Function: First version, 2004
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Paper provided by Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg in its series FFB-Discussionpaper with number 45.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: Feb 2004
Date of revision: Jul 2004
Handle: RePEc:leu:wpaper:45
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://ffb.uni-lueneburg.de/repec/leu/

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  1. Osberg, Lars & Phipps, Shelley, 1993. "Labour Supply with Quantity Constraints: Estimates from a Large Sample of Canadian Workers," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 45(2), pages 269-91, April.
  2. Joachim Merz, 2002. "Time Use Research and Time Use Data – Actual Topics and New Frontiers," FFB-Discussionpaper 32, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg.
  3. Hamermesh, Daniel S, 1999. "The Timing of Work over Time," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(452), pages 37-66, January.
  4. Killingsworth, Mark R. & Heckman, James J., 1987. "Female labor supply: A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 2, pages 103-204 Elsevier.
  5. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2002. "Timing, togetherness and time windfalls," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 601-623.
  6. Blundell, Richard & Ham, John & Meghir, Costas, 1987. "Unemployment and Female Labour Supply," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(388a), pages 44-64, Supplemen.
  7. Lee, Lung-Fei, 1983. "Generalized Econometric Models with Selectivity," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 51(2), pages 507-12, March.
  8. Pencavel, John, 1987. "Labor supply of men: A survey," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & R. Layard (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 1, pages 3-102 Elsevier.
  9. John C. Ham, 1980. "Estimation of a Labour Supply Model with Censoring Due to Unemployment and Underemployment," Working Papers 521, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  10. repec:ese:iserwp:2000-22 is not listed on IDEAS
  11. Merz, Joachim & Burgert, Derik, 2003. "Working Hour Arrangements and Working Hours A Microeconometric Analysis Based on German Time Diary Data," MPRA Paper 5979, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. Hamermesh, Daniel S, 1998. "When We Work," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 321-25, May.
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