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When We Work

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  • Hamermesh, Daniel S

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  • Hamermesh, Daniel S, 1998. "When We Work," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(2), pages 321-325, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:88:y:1998:i:2:p:321-25
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Merz, Joachim & Hanglberger, Dominik & Rucha, Rafael, 2009. "The Timing of Daily Demand for Goods and Services – Multivariate Probit Estimates and Microsimulation Results for an Aged Population with German Time Use Diary Data," MPRA Paper 16303, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Merz, Joachim & Böhm, Paul & Burgert, Derik, 2005. "Timing, Fragmentation of Work and Income Inequality - An Earnings Treatment Effects Approach," MPRA Paper 5972, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Merz, Joachim & Böhm, Paul & Burgert, Derik, 2005. "Arbeitszeitarrangements und Entlohnung Ein Treatment-Effects-Ansatz für Freiberufler, Unternehmer und abhängig Beschäftigte," MPRA Paper 5970, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Joachim Merz & Lars Osberg, 2009. "Keeping in touch – A benefit of public holidays using time use diary data," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 6(1), pages 130-166, September.
    5. Hugh Millward & Jamie Spinney, 2009. "Time use and rurality – Canada 2005," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 6(1), pages 109-129, September.
    6. Kawaguchi, Daiji & Lee, Jungmin & Hamermesh, Daniel S., 2013. "A gift of time," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 205-216.
    7. Katerina Vrotsou & Kajsa Ellegård & Matthew Cooper, 2009. "Exploring time diaries using semi-automated activity pattern extraction," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 6(1), pages 1-25, September.
    8. Casey B. Mulligan, 1998. "Microfoundations and macro implications of indivisible labor," Discussion Paper / Institute for Empirical Macroeconomics 126, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    9. Joachim Merz & Derik Burgert, 2003. "Working Hour Arrangements and Working Hours - A Microeconometric Analysis Based on German Time Diary Data," FFB-Discussionpaper 41, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg.
    10. Sajeda Amin & Luciana Suran, 2009. "Terms of marriage and time-use patterns of young wives – Evidence from rural Bangladesh," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 6(1), pages 92-108, September.
    11. Benoît Rapoport & Céline Bourdais, 2008. "Parental time and working schedules," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 21(4), pages 903-932, October.
    12. Merz, Joachim & Burgert, Derik, 2005. "Arbeitszeitarrangements - Neue Ergebnisse aus der nationalen Zeitbudgeterhebung 2001/02 im Zeitvergleich zu 1991/92," MPRA Paper 5973, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Antonio García Sánchez & María del Mar Vázquez Méndez, 2005. "The timing of work in a general equilibrium model with shiftwork," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 29(1), pages 149-179, January.
    14. Timo Anttila & Tomi Oinas & Jouko Nätti, 2009. "Predictors of time famine among Finnish employees – Work, family or leisure?," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 6(1), pages 73-91, September.
    15. Joseph G. Altonji & Emiko Usui, 2007. "Work Hours, Wages, and Vacation Leave," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 60(3), pages 408-428, April.
    16. Hallberg, Daniel, 2003. "Synchronous leisure, jointness and household labor supply," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 185-203, April.
    17. Joachim Merz & Derik Burgert, 2004. "Wer arbeitet wann? Arbeitszeitarrangements von Selbständigen und abhängig Beschäftigten: Eine mikroökonometrische Analyse deutscher Zeitbudgetdaten," FFB-Discussionpaper 45, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg, revised Jul 2004.
    18. Joachim Merz & Paul Böhm & Dominik Hanglberger & J.F. Rafael Rucha & Henning Stolze, 2007. "Wann werden Serviceleistungen nachgefragt? Ein Mikrosimulationsmodell alternativer Ladenöffnungszeiten mit Daten der Zeitbudgeterhebung ServSim," FFB-Discussionpaper 70, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)), LEUPHANA University Lüneburg.
    19. Merz, Joachim & Burgert, Derik, 2003. "Working Hour Arrangements and Working Hours – A Microeconometric Analysis Based on German Time Use Diary Data," IZA Discussion Papers 922, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    20. Joachim Merz & Dominik Hanglberger & Rafael Rucha, 2010. "The Timing of Daily Demand for Goods and Services—Microsimulation Policy Results of an Aging Society, Increasing Labour Market Flexibility, and Extended Public Childcare in Germany," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 119-141, June.
    21. Michael Huberman & Chris Minns, 2005. "Hours of Work in Old and New Worlds: The Long View, 1870-2000," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp95, IIIS.
    22. Killian Mullan & Lyn Craig, 2009. "Harmonising extended measures of parental childcare in the time-diary surveys of four countries – Proximity versus responsibility," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 6(1), pages 48-72, September.
    23. repec:kap:reveho:v:15:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s11150-017-9365-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    24. Roman Sustek, 2005. "Plant-Level Nonconvexities and the Monetary Transmission Mechanism," Working Papers 2005/09, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
    25. Sandra L. Hofferth, 2009. "Changes in American children’s time – 1997 to 2003," electronic International Journal of Time Use Research, Research Institute on Professions (Forschungsinstitut Freie Berufe (FFB)) and The International Association for Time Use Research (IATUR), vol. 6(1), pages 26-47, September.

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