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Finance and Growth in Africa: The Broken Link

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  • Panicos O. Demetriades

    ()

  • Gregory A. James

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Abstract

Utilizing the latest panel cointegration methods we provide new empirical evidence from 18 countries that suggests that the link between finance and growth in Sub-Saharan Africa is ‘broken’. Specifically, our findings suggest that banking system development in this region follows economic growth. They also indicate that there is no link between bank credit and economic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Panicos O. Demetriades & Gregory A. James, 2011. "Finance and Growth in Africa: The Broken Link," Discussion Papers in Economics 11/17, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:11/17
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    File URL: http://www.le.ac.uk/economics/research/repec/lec/leecon/dp11-17.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Rafael E. De Hoyos & Vasilis Sarafidis, 2006. "Testing for cross-sectional dependence in panel-data models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 6(4), pages 482-496, December.
    2. Patrick Honohan & Thorsten Beck, 2007. "Making Finance Work for Africa," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 6626.
    3. Bai, Jushan & Kao, Chihwa & Ng, Serena, 2009. "Panel cointegration with global stochastic trends," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 149(1), pages 82-99, April.
    4. Svetlana Andrianova & Badi Baltagi & Panicos Demetriades & David Fielding, 2010. "The African Credit Trap," Discussion Papers in Economics 10/18, Department of Economics, University of Leicester, revised Oct 2010.
      • Svetlana Andrianova & Badi H. Baltagi & Panicos O. Demetriades & David Fielding, 2010. "The African Credit Trap," Working Papers 1004, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised May 2010.
    5. Harris, Richard D. F. & Tzavalis, Elias, 1999. "Inference for unit roots in dynamic panels where the time dimension is fixed," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 201-226, August.
    6. M. Hashem Pesaran, 2007. "A simple panel unit root test in the presence of cross-section dependence," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(2), pages 265-312.
    7. Joakim Westerlund, 2007. "Testing for Error Correction in Panel Data," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 69(6), pages 709-748, December.
    8. Damiaan Persyn & Joakim Westerlund, 2008. "Error-correction–based cointegration tests for panel data," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 8(2), pages 232-241, June.
    9. Pesaran, M. Hashem & Vanessa Smith, L. & Yamagata, Takashi, 2013. "Panel unit root tests in the presence of a multifactor error structure," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 175(2), pages 94-115.
    10. Pesaran, M.H., 2004. "‘General Diagnostic Tests for Cross Section Dependence in Panels’," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0435, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    11. Im, Kyung So & Pesaran, M. Hashem & Shin, Yongcheol, 2003. "Testing for unit roots in heterogeneous panels," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 53-74, July.
    12. Levin, Andrew & Lin, Chien-Fu & James Chu, Chia-Shang, 2002. "Unit root tests in panel data: asymptotic and finite-sample properties," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 108(1), pages 1-24, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Svetlana Andrianova & Badi Baltagi & Thorsten Beck & Panicos Demetriades & David Fielding & Stephen Hall & Steven Koch & Robert Lensink & Johan Rewilak & Peter Rousseau, 2015. "A New International Database on Financial Fragility," Discussion Papers in Economics 15/18, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
    2. Cherkas N., Atamanchuk Z., 2015. "Assessing macroeconomic effects of monetary policy in Ukraine," Economy and Forecasting, Valeriy Heyets, issue 3, pages 123-134.
    3. Samuel Bates & Cheikh Tidiane Ndiaye, 2014. "Economic Growth from a Structural Unobserved Component Modeling: The Case of Senegal," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(2), pages 951-965.
    4. Oliver Gloede & Ornsiri Rungruxsirivorn, 2013. "Local Financial Development and Household Welfare: Microevidence from Thai Households," Emerging Markets Finance and Trade, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 49(4), pages 22-45, July.
    5. Menyah, Kojo & Nazlioglu, Saban & Wolde-Rufael, Yemane, 2014. "Financial development, trade openness and economic growth in African countries: New insights from a panel causality approach," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 386-394.
    6. Kumar, Ronald Ravinesh & Stauvermann, Peter Josef & Loganathan, Nanthakumar & Kumar, Radika Devi, 2015. "Exploring the role of energy, trade and financial development in explaining economic growth in South Africa: A revisit," Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Elsevier, vol. 52(C), pages 1300-1311.
    7. Yabibal M. Walle, 2014. "Revisiting the Finance–Growth Nexus in Sub-Saharan Africa: Results from Error Correction-based Panel Cointegration Tests," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 26(2), pages 310-321, June.
    8. Inoue, Takeshi & Hamori, Shigeyuki, 2013. "Financial Permeation and Economic Growth: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 53417, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Effiong, Ekpeno, 2015. "Financial Development, Institutions and Economic Growth: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," MPRA Paper 66085, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. repec:dau:papers:123456789/12185 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Roseline Oluitan, 2012. "Financial Development and Economic Growth in Africa: Lessons and Prospects," Business and Economic Research, Macrothink Institute, vol. 2(2), pages 54-67, December.
    12. Halkos, George & Polemis, Michael, 2016. "Examining the impact of financial development on the environmental Kuznets curve hypothesis," MPRA Paper 75368, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Rousseau, Peter L. & D’Onofrio, Alexandra, 2013. "Monetization, Financial Development, and Growth: Time Series Evidence from 22 Countries in Sub-Saharan Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 132-153.
    14. Samargandi, Nahla & Kutan, Ali M., 2016. "Private credit spillovers and economic growth: Evidence from BRICS countries," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 56-84.
    15. Fanta Ashenafi Beyene & Makina Daniel, 2016. "The Finance Growth Link: Comparative Analysis of Two Eastern African Countries," Comparative Economic Research, De Gruyter Open, vol. 19(3), pages 147-167, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Panel cointegration; cross-sectional dependence; African financial under-development; African credit markets;

    JEL classification:

    • G21 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Banks; Other Depository Institutions; Micro Finance Institutions; Mortgages
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance

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