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ICT, Offshoring, and the Demand for Part-time Workers: The Case of Japanese Manufacturing

Author

Listed:
  • Kozo Kiyota

    (Keio Economic Observatory, Keio University)

  • Sawako Maruyama

    (Faculty of Economics, Kobe University)

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of information and communication technology (ICT) and offshoring on the skill demand in Japanese manufacturing. One of the contributions of this paper is that we focus explicitly on the demand for low-wage part-time workers, which we call low skilled workers. Estimating a system of variable factor demands for the period 1980--2011, we found that industries with higher ICT stock shifted demand from middle-low to middle-high and low skilled workers. Offshoring is associated with the increasing demand for high skilled workers but it has insignificant effects on the demand for middle-high, middle-low, and low skilled workers. The results together suggest that the increasing demand for low-wage part-time workers can be attributable to ICT in Japan.

Suggested Citation

  • Kozo Kiyota & Sawako Maruyama, 2016. "ICT, Offshoring, and the Demand for Part-time Workers: The Case of Japanese Manufacturing," Keio-IES Discussion Paper Series 2016-015, Institute for Economics Studies, Keio University.
  • Handle: RePEc:keo:dpaper:2016-015
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:ksp:journ1:v:4:y:2017:i:2:p:135-143 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Theresa M. GREANEY & Baybars KARACAOVALI, 2017. "Trade, Growth and Economic Inequality in the Asia-Pacific Region: Lessons for Policymakers," Journal of Economics and Political Economy, KSP Journals, vol. 4(2), pages 135-143, June.
    3. repec:eee:jjieco:v:51:y:2019:i:c:p:1-18 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor demand; Part-time workers; Offshoring; Information and Communication Technology; Skill;

    JEL classification:

    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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