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On the Demand for Female Workers in Japan: The Role of ICT and Offshoring

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  • Kozo Kiyota

    (Keio Economic Observatory Keio University 2-15-45, Mita, Minato-ku Tokyo 108-8345, Japanand Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry 1-3-1, Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku Tokyo 100-8901, Japan Author email: kiyota@sanken.keio.ac.jp)

  • Sawako Maruyama

    (Faculty of Economics Kindai University 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka City Osaka 577-8502, Japan Author email: maruyama@eco.kindai.ac.jp)

Abstract

This paper examines the determinants of the demand for female workers, focusing on the role of information and communication technology (ICT) and offshoring. Estimating a system of variable factor demands for manufacturing industries between 1980 and 2011, we find that, whereas the ICT capital stock has significantly positive effects on the demand for low-, middle-high-, and high-skilled female workers, it has significantly negative effects on the demand for middle-low-skilled female workers. In contrast, offshoring has insignificant effects on the demand for female workers, which suggests that offshoring is at least neutral on the demand for female workers.

Suggested Citation

  • Kozo Kiyota & Sawako Maruyama, 2018. "On the Demand for Female Workers in Japan: The Role of ICT and Offshoring," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 17(2), pages 25-46, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:asiaec:v:17:y:2018:i:2:p:25-46
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    1. Kiyota, Kozo & Maruyama, Sawako, 2017. "ICT, offshoring, and the demand for part-time workers: The case of Japanese manufacturing," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 75-86.
    2. Yoko Konishi & Takashi Saito, 2020. "Total Factor Productivity Changes in Japanese Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises in 1982–2016: Suggestive Indications of an IT Revolution?," Asian Economic Papers, MIT Press, vol. 19(3), pages 21-37, Fall.
    3. Endoh, Masahiro, 2021. "Offshoring and working hours adjustments in a within-firm labor market," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 60(C).
    4. Koyo Miyoshi, 2021. "The Decline in the Labor Share: Evidence from Japanese Manufacturers f Panel Data," Discussion papers ron340, Policy Research Institute, Ministry of Finance Japan.

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand

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