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An ultimatum game with multidimensional response strategies

Author

Listed:
  • Werner Güth

    () (Max Planck Institute of Economics, Strategic Interaction Group, Jena)

  • M. Vittoria Levati

    () (University of Verona and Max Planck Institute of Economics, Strategic Interaction Group, Jena)

  • Chiara Nardi

    () (University of Verona)

  • Ivan Soraperra

    () (University of Verona)

Abstract

We enrich the choice task of responders in ultimatum games by allow- ing them to independently decide whether to collect what is offered to them and whether to destroy what the proposer demanded. Such a multidimensional response format intends to cast further light on the motives guiding responder behavior. Using a conservative and strin- gent approach to type classification, we find that the overwhelming majority of responder participants choose consistently with outcome- based preference models. There are, however, few responders that destroy the proposer's demand of a large pie share and concurrently reject their own offer, thereby suggesting a strong concern for integrity.

Suggested Citation

  • Werner Güth & M. Vittoria Levati & Chiara Nardi & Ivan Soraperra, 2014. "An ultimatum game with multidimensional response strategies," Jena Economic Research Papers 2014-018, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  • Handle: RePEc:jrp:jrpwrp:2014-018
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Ultimatum; Social preferences; Incomplete information; Experiments;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D63 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Equity, Justice, Inequality, and Other Normative Criteria and Measurement
    • D74 - Microeconomics - - Analysis of Collective Decision-Making - - - Conflict; Conflict Resolution; Alliances; Revolutions

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