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Coping with advantageous inequity - Field evidence from professional penalty kicking

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Abstract

This contribution examines the effect of advantageous inequity on performance using data from top-level penalty kicking in soccer. Results indicate that, on average, professionals do not perform worse when they experience unfair advantages. However, we find a negative effect of advantageous inequity in situations where success is less important.

Suggested Citation

  • Mario Lackner & Hendrik Sonnabend, 2017. "Coping with advantageous inequity - Field evidence from professional penalty kicking," Economics working papers 2017-21, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  • Handle: RePEc:jku:econwp:2017_21
    Note: English
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    File URL: http://www.econ.jku.at/papers/2017/wp1721.pdf
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    Keywords

    advantageous inequity; guilt; self-serving bias; fairness; performance;

    JEL classification:

    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • Z29 - Other Special Topics - - Sports Economics - - - Other

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