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Low Paid Employment in Britain: Estimating State-Dependence and Stepping Stone Effects

Author

Listed:
  • Cai, Lixin

    (NILS, Flinders University)

  • Mavromaras, Kostas

    (University of Adelaide)

  • Sloane, Peter J.

    (Swansea University)

Abstract

Using 18 waves of the British Household Panel Study, this paper examines state dependence and stepping stone effects of low pay. A distinguishing feature is that five types of transition- not in the labour force (NILF), unemployment, self-employment, low pay and higher pay are modelled separately. The results show that both state dependence and stepping stone effects of low pay are present. However, there is no evidence to support a low-pay no-pay cycle. The introduction of the national minimum wage does not appear to have affected state-dependence and stepping stone effects of low pay.

Suggested Citation

  • Cai, Lixin & Mavromaras, Kostas & Sloane, Peter J., 2016. "Low Paid Employment in Britain: Estimating State-Dependence and Stepping Stone Effects," IZA Discussion Papers 9633, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9633
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Alexander Plum & Gail Pacheco & Kabir Dasgupta, 2021. "When There is No Way Up: Reconsidering Low‐paid Jobs as Stepping‐stones," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 97(318), pages 387-409, September.
    2. Dorsett, Richard & Lucchino, Paolo, 2018. "Young people's labour market transitions: The role of early experiences," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 29-46.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    low pay; unemployment; state dependence; dynamic models;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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