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Low-Wage Jobs – Springboard to High-Paid Ones?

  • Andreas Knabe

    (Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg and CESifo)

  • Alexander Plum

    ()

    (Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg)

We examine whether low-paid jobs have an effect on the probability that unemployed persons obtain better-paid jobs in the future (springboard effect). We make use of data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP) and apply a dynamic random-effects probit model. Our results suggest that low-wage jobs can act as springboards to better-paid work. The improvement of the chance to obtain a high-wage job by accepting low-paid work is particularly large for less-skilled persons and for individuals with longer periods of unemployment. Low-paid work is less beneficial if the job is associated with a low social status.

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Paper provided by Tor Vergata University, CEIS in its series CEIS Research Paper with number 246.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: 26 Jul 2012
Date of revision: 26 Jul 2012
Handle: RePEc:rtv:ceisrp:246
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  1. Stewart, Mark, 2006. "The Inter-related Dynamics of Unemployment and Low-Wage Employment," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 741, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  2. Stewart, M.B. & Swaffield, J.K., 1997. "Low Pay Dynamics and Transition Probabilities," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 495, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
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  12. Mundlak, Yair, 1978. "On the Pooling of Time Series and Cross Section Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 69-85, January.
  13. James J. Heckman, 2001. "Micro Data, Heterogeneity, and the Evaluation of Public Policy: Nobel Lecture," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 109(4), pages 673-748, August.
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