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The Slump and Immigration Policy in Europe

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  • Hatton, Timothy J.

    () (University of Essex)

Abstract

Historical experience suggests that when a period of rising immigration is followed by a sudden slump, this can trigger a policy backlash. This has not occurred in the current recession. This paper examines three links in the chain between the slump and immigration policy. First, although immigration flows have responded to the slump, and immigrants have borne more than their share of the burden, this has done little to protect the employment of non-immigrants. Second, despite the recession for Europe as a whole, attitudes to immigration have not changed very much, and they have been influenced more by fiscal concerns than by rising unemployment. Third, while far right parties have used the recession to renew the political pressure for tougher immigration policies, governments have been constrained by the composition of immigration and by EU regulation.

Suggested Citation

  • Hatton, Timothy J., 2014. "The Slump and Immigration Policy in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 7985, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7985
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Tito Boeri, 2010. "Immigration to the Land of Redistribution," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 77(308), pages 651-687, October.
    2. Beine, M. & Bricongne,J-C. & Bourgeon, P., 2013. "Aggregate Fluctuations and International Migration," Working papers 453, Banque de France.
    3. Dustmann, Christian & Glitz, Albrecht & Vogel, Thorsten, 2010. "Employment, wages, and the economic cycle: Differences between immigrants and natives," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 54(1), pages 1-17, January.
    4. Jakub Cerveny & Jan Ours, 2013. "Unemployment of Non-Western Immigrants in the Great Recession," De Economist, Springer, vol. 161(4), pages 463-480, December.
    5. O'Rourke, Kevin H. & Sinnott, Richard, 2006. "The determinants of individual attitudes towards immigration," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 22(4), pages 838-861, December.
    6. Hatton, Timothy J. & Williamson, Jeffrey G., 1998. "The Age of Mass Migration: Causes and Economic Impact," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780195116519.
    7. Giovanni Facchini & Anna Maria Mayda, 2009. "Does the Welfare State Affect Individual Attitudes toward Immigrants? Evidence across Countries," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 91(2), pages 295-314, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jesús Fernández-Huertas Moraga & Hillel Rapoport, 2015. "Tradable Refugee-admission Quotas and EU Asylum Policy," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 61(3-4), pages 638-672.
    2. Jesús Fernández-Huertas Moraga & Hillel Rapoport, 2015. "Tradable Refugee-Admission Quotas, Matching and the New European Agenda for Migration," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 13(2), pages 50-56, August.
    3. Jesús Fernández-Huertas Moraga & Hillel Rapoport, 2015. "Tradable Refugee-Admission Quotas, Matching and the New European Agenda for Migration," ifo DICE Report, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 13(2), pages 50-56, 08.
    4. Hillel Rapoport & Jesús Fernández-Huertas Moraga, 2014. "Tradable Refugee-admission Quotas: a Policy Proposal to Reform the EU Asylum Policy," RSCAS Working Papers 2014/101, European University Institute.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    recession; European immigration; immigration policy;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • F52 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - National Security; Economic Nationalism
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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