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Remittances and Occupational Outcomes of the Household Members Left-Behind

  • Piracha, Matloob

    ()

    (University of Kent)

  • Randazzo, Teresa

    ()

    (University of Kent)

  • Vadean, Florin

    ()

    (University of Kent)

This paper analyses the role of remittances and migration on the occupational outcomes of the household members left behind in Tajikistan. Using the control function approach, we show that, contrary to some existing evidence, there is no “dependency” effect of remittances. Our results show that remittances received by households in Tajikistan have an important contribution to generate employment opportunities for those remaining in the country. This is likely to have a positive impact on the growth and development in Tajikistan. The results obtained are likely to have policy implications for other developing countries as well.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 7582.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7582
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  1. Piracha, Matloob & Vadean, Florin, 2010. "Return Migration and Occupational Choice: Evidence from Albania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(8), pages 1141-1155, August.
  2. Bauer, Thomas K. & Sinning, Mathias, 2005. "Blinder-Oaxaca Decomposition for Tobit Models," RWI Discussion Papers 32, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung (RWI).
  3. Dustmann, Christian & Kirchkamp, Oliver, 2001. "The Optimal Migration Duration and Activity Choice after Re-migration," IZA Discussion Papers 266, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Helena Holmlund & Mikael Lindahl & Erik Plug, 2010. "The Causal Effect of Parents' Schooling on Children's Schooling - A Comparison of Estimation Methods," CESifo Working Paper Series 3234, CESifo Group Munich.
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  7. Antman, Francisca M., 2012. "The Impact of Migration on Family Left Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 6374, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Mendola, Mariapia & Carletto, Calogero, 2012. "Migration and gender differences in the home labour market: Evidence from Albania," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 870-880.
  9. Patricia Justino & Olga Shemyakina, 2012. "Remittances and labor supply in post-conflict Tajikistan," IZA Journal of Labor & Development, Springer, vol. 1(1), pages 1-28, December.
  10. Ronald Oaxaca, 1971. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," Working Papers 396, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  11. Andrew M. Gill, 1989. "The role of discrimination in determining occupational structure," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 42(4), pages 610-623, July.
  12. Ralph Chami & Connel Fullenkamp & Samir Jahjah, 2005. "Are Immigrant Remittance Flows a Source of Capital for Development?," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 52(1), pages 55-81, April.
  13. Abhijit V. Banerjee & Andrew F. Newman, 1990. "Occupational Choice and the Process of Development," Discussion Papers 911, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  14. Matloob Piracha & Florin Vadean, 2009. "Return Migration and Occupational Choice," Studies in Economics 0905, School of Economics, University of Kent.
  15. Dean Yang, 2008. "International Migration, Remittances and Household Investment: Evidence from Philippine Migrants' Exchange Rate Shocks," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(528), pages 591-630, 04.
  16. Bruce D. Meyer & Wallace K. C. Mok & James X. Sullivan, 2009. "The Under-Reporting of Transfers in Household Surveys: Its Nature and Consequences," NBER Working Papers 15181, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  17. Gustaf Bruze, 2011. "Marriage Choices of Movie Stars: Does Spouse's Education Matter?," Journal of Human Capital, University of Chicago Press, vol. 5(1), pages 1 - 28.
  18. Paulson, Anna L. & Townsend, Robert, 2004. "Entrepreneurship and financial constraints in Thailand," Journal of Corporate Finance, Elsevier, vol. 10(2), pages 229-262, March.
  19. Alice Mesnard, 2004. "Temporary migration and capital market imperfections," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(2), pages 242-262, April.
  20. Gomulka, Joanna & Stern, Nicholas, 1990. "The Employment of Married Women in the United Kingdom 1970-83," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 57(226), pages 171-99, May.
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