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The Role of Discrimination in Determining Occupational Structure

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  • Andrew M. Gill

Abstract

The author of this study attempts to isolate the role of discrimination in determining racial differences in occupational structure. Logit techniques are used to identify and distinguish between determinants of the probability that an individual will choose an occupation and the probability that an individual will be hired for a desired job. The empirical results indicate that much of the under-representation of blacks in managerial, sales and clerical, and craft occupations can be attributed to employment discrimination. These findings thus seriously challenge human capital models, which treat occupational distribution as resulting from individual choice.

Suggested Citation

  • Andrew M. Gill, 1989. "The Role of Discrimination in Determining Occupational Structure," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 42(4), pages 610-623, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:ilrrev:v:42:y:1989:i:4:p:610-623
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    Cited by:

    1. Larry D. Singell & Joe A. Stone, 1993. "Gender Differences In Ph.D. Economists' Careers," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 11(4), pages 95-106, October.
    2. Juan Prieto Rodríguez & María José Suárez Fernández, 2006. "Like father like son? Intergenerational links within occupations and public employment," Hacienda Pública Española, IEF, vol. 178(3), pages 81-111, September.
    3. Larry L. Howard & Nishith Prakash, 2012. "Do employment quotas explain the occupational choices of disadvantaged minorities in India?," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(4), pages 489-513, August.
    4. Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf & Zweimuller, Josef, 1997. "Unequal Assignment and Unequal Promotion in Job Ladders," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 15(1), pages 43-71, January.
    5. B. T. Hirsch & D. A. Macpherson, "undated". "Wages, racial composition, and quality sorting in labor markets," Institute for Research on Poverty Discussion Papers 1038-94, University of Wisconsin Institute for Research on Poverty.
    6. Joe Darden, 2005. "Black occupational achievement in the toronto census metropolitan area: Does race matter?," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 33(2), pages 31-54, December.
    7. Barry T. Hirsch & David A. Macpherson, 2004. "Wages, Sorting on Skill, and the Racial Composition of Jobs," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(1), pages 189-210, January.
    8. Shigeyuki Hamori & Guifu Chen, 2008. "Do Chinese employers discriminate against females when hiring employees ?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 10(14), pages 1-17.
    9. Madhu Mohanty, 1998. "Do US employers discriminate against females when hiring their employees?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(11), pages 1471-1482.
    10. Madhu S. Mohanty, 2003. "An Alternative Explanation for the Equality of Male and Female Unemployment Rates in the U.S. Labor Market in the Late 1980s," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 29(1), pages 69-92, Winter.
    11. David Bjerk, 2007. "The Differing Nature of Black-White Wage Inequality Across Occupational Sectors," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(2).
    12. G.M. Arif & M. Irfan, 1997. "Return Migration and Occupational Change: The Case of Pakistani Migrants Returned from the Middle East," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 36(1), pages 1-37.
    13. Piracha, Matloob & Randazzo, Teresa & Vadean, Florin, 2013. "Remittances and Occupational Outcomes of the Household Members Left-Behind," IZA Discussion Papers 7582, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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