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Do Chinese Employers Discriminate Against Females When Hiring Employees?

In: Rural Labor Migration, Discrimination, and the New Dual Labor Market in China

Author

Listed:
  • Guifu Chen

    (Xiamen University)

  • Shigeyuki Hamori

    (Kobe University)

Abstract

To determine if Chinese employers discriminated when hiring females in 1996 and 2005, we applied the statistical approach of Johnson (1983) and Mohanty (1998) to the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) questionnaire (1997 data and pooled data of 2004 and 2006). Empirical results of the 1996 sample reveal that male workers generally received less favorable treatment and, consequently, enjoyed a lower average employment probability than female workers. However, approximately a decade after the enactment of the labor law, the 2005 sample shows that male workers were generally preferentially treated relative to female workers with otherwise identical laboring characteristics. Our empirical results suggest that an increase in the educational level of females, in the employment probability of females aged 25 and younger, and in the employment chances of females working in the government sector may prove effective in eliminating employment discrimination by gender.

Suggested Citation

  • Guifu Chen & Shigeyuki Hamori, 2014. "Do Chinese Employers Discriminate Against Females When Hiring Employees?," SpringerBriefs in Economics, in: Rural Labor Migration, Discrimination, and the New Dual Labor Market in China, edition 127, chapter 0, pages 39-51, Springer.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:spbchp:978-3-642-41109-0_4
    DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-41109-0_4
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Johnson, Janet L, 1983. "Sex Differentials in Unemployment Rates: A Case for No Concern," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(2), pages 293-303, April.
    2. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
    3. Madhu Mohanty, 1998. "Do US employers discriminate against females when hiring their employees?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(11), pages 1471-1482.
    4. John Knight & Lina Song, 2003. "Increasing urban wage inequality in China," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 11(4), pages 597-619, December.
    5. Cameron,A. Colin & Trivedi,Pravin K., 2005. "Microeconometrics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521848053.
    6. Meng, Xin, 1998. "Male-female wage determination and gender wage discrimination in China's rural industrial sector," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 5(1), pages 67-89, March.
    7. Abowd, John M & Killingsworth, Mark R, 1984. "Do Minority-White Unemployment Differences Really Exist?," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 2(1), pages 64-72, January.
    8. Andrew M. Gill, 1989. "The Role of Discrimination in Determining Occupational Structure," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 42(4), pages 610-623, July.
    9. Xin Meng & Junsen Zhang & Pak-Wai Liu, 2000. "Sectoral gender wage differentials and discrimination in the transitional Chinese economy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 13(2), pages 331-352.
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    Cited by:

    1. Almas Heshmati & Biwei Su, 2017. "Analysis Of Gender Wage Differential In China’S Urban Labor Market," The Singapore Economic Review (SER), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 62(02), pages 423-445, June.
    2. Almas Heshmati & Biwei Su & Seon-Ae Kim, 2015. "Measurement and Analysis of Well-Being in Developed Regions in China," China Economic Policy Review (CEPR), World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd., vol. 4(01), pages 1-22, June.
    3. Guifu Chen & Shigeyuki Hamori, 2014. "Bivariate Probit Analysis of the Differences Between Male and Female Formal Employment in Urban China," SpringerBriefs in Economics, in: Rural Labor Migration, Discrimination, and the New Dual Labor Market in China, edition 127, chapter 0, pages 65-76, Springer.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor Market; Female Worker; Female Employment; Male Worker; Labor Force Participation Rate;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J7 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination

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