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Intrafirm Mobility and Sex Differences in Pay

Author

Listed:
  • Ransom, Michael R.

    () (Brigham Young University)

  • Oaxaca, Ronald L.

    () (University of Arizona)

Abstract

In this paper we analyze eight years of employment data of a regional grocery store chain in the U.S. The data include job titles, wage rates, and earnings for all employees. We examine initial job assignments, mobility between departments, and mobility into supervisory and management positions in the firm. We model the flows of individuals between different departments and jobs within the firm as a Markov process. The estimated transition probabilities imply that expected seniority is greater for women. We find a pattern of intrafirm mobility and initial job assignment that generally penalizes women, even after taking account of individuals' characteristics.

Suggested Citation

  • Ransom, Michael R. & Oaxaca, Ronald L., 2003. "Intrafirm Mobility and Sex Differences in Pay," IZA Discussion Papers 704, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp704
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Ronald Oaxaca & Michael Ransom, 2003. "Using Econometric Models for Intrafirm Equity Salary Adjustments," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 1(3), pages 221-249, December.
    2. Oaxaca, Ronald, 1973. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 14(3), pages 693-709, October.
    3. Weiss, Andrew, 1984. "Determinants of Quit Behavior," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 2(3), pages 371-387, July.
    4. Baldwin, Marjorie L & Butler, Richard J & Johnson, William G, 2001. "A Hierarchical Theory of Occupational Segregation and Wage Discrimination," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 39(1), pages 94-110, January.
    5. Oaxaca, Ronald L. & Ransom, Michael R., 1994. "On discrimination and the decomposition of wage differentials," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 5-21, March.
    6. Neuman, Shoshana & Oaxaca, Ronald L, 1998. "Estimating Labour Market Discrimination with Selectivity Corrected Wage Equations: Methodological Considerations and an Illustration from Israel," CEPR Discussion Papers 1915, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Anica Rose, 2017. "Subjective Appraisals of Employee Potential: Do Gender and Managerial Level Matter?," Working Papers Dissertations 22, Paderborn University, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics.
    2. Christian Pfeifer & Tatjana Sohr, 2009. "Analysing the Gender Wage Gap (GWG) Using Personnel Records," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(2), pages 257-282, June.
    3. Curtis R. Price, 2012. "Gender, Competition, and Managerial Decisions," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 58(1), pages 114-122, January.
    4. Kunze, Astrid & Miller, Amalia, 2014. "Women Helping Women? Evidence from Private Sector Data on Workplace Hierarchies," IZA Discussion Papers 8725, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Chung Choe, 2013. "Determinants of Labor Market Outcomes of Disabled Men Before and After the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990," Korean Economic Review, Korean Economic Association, vol. 29, pages 211-233.
    6. Michael R Ransom & Ronald L. Oaxaca, 2010. "New Market Power Models and Sex Differences in Pay," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(2), pages 267-289, April.
    7. Ransom, Michael R. & Oaxaca, Ronald L., 2005. "Sex Differences in Pay in a "New Monopsony" Model of the Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 1870, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. repec:iza:izawol:journl:2017:n:358 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Doyle, William R. & Skinner, Benjamin T., 2016. "Estimating the education-earnings equation using geographic variation," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 254-267.
    10. Francine Blau & Jed DeVaro, 2006. "New Evidence on Gender Differences in Promotion Rates: An Empirical Analysis of a Sample of New Hires," Working Papers 891, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    11. Grund, Christian, 2002. "The Wage Policy of Firms – Comparative Evidence for the U.S. and Germany from Personnel Data," IZA Discussion Papers 605, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    12. repec:spr:jlabre:v:38:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s12122-017-9254-7 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Empar Pons Blasco & Luisa Escriche Bertolín, 2009. "Who moves up the career ladder? A model of gender differences in job promotion," Working Papers. Serie AD 2009-23, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    seniority; gender wage differentials; job mobility;

    JEL classification:

    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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