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Government Education Expenditures, Pre-Primary Education and School Performance: A Cross-Country Analysis

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Listed:
  • Del Boca, Daniela

    () (University of Turin)

  • Monfardini, Chiara

    () (University of Bologna)

  • See, Sarah Grace

    () (University of York)

Abstract

Using data from OECD's PISA, Eurostat and World Bank's WDI, we explore how child cognitive outcomes at the aggregate country level are related to macroeconomic conditions, specifically government education expenditures and early education experience. We find that both government expenditures in education and attendance to early child care are associated with better later school performance. We also consider different childcare characteristics such as duration and quality, which appear to have significant effects Our results may imply that policies encouraging childcare expansion should also take into account quality issues.

Suggested Citation

  • Del Boca, Daniela & Monfardini, Chiara & See, Sarah Grace, 2018. "Government Education Expenditures, Pre-Primary Education and School Performance: A Cross-Country Analysis," IZA Discussion Papers 11375, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11375
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Paul E. Peterson & Ludger Woessmann, 2010. "New Empirical Analysis in the Economics of Education," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 120(546), pages 183-186, August.
    2. Carneiro, Pedro & Heckman, James J., 2003. "Human Capital Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 821, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Datta Gupta, Nabanita & Simonsen, Marianne, 2016. "Academic performance and type of early childhood care," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 217-229.
    4. Daniela Del Boca & Chiara Monfardini & Cheti Nicoletti, 2017. "Parental and Child Time Investments and the Cognitive Development of Adolescents," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(2), pages 565-608.
    5. Jorge Luis García & James J. Heckman & Duncan Ermini Leaf & María José Prados, 2016. "The Life-cycle Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program," NBER Working Papers 22993, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Erik Thorbecke & Hong-Sang Jung, 2001. "The Impact of Public Education Expenditure on Human Capital, Growth, and Poverty in Tanzania and Zambia; A General Equilibrium Approach," IMF Working Papers 01/106, International Monetary Fund.
    7. Petra E. Todd & Kenneth I. Wolpin, 2003. "On The Specification and Estimation of The Production Function for Cognitive Achievement," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages 3-33, February.
    8. World Bank, 2016. "World Development Indicators 2016," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 23969.
    9. Christina Felfe & Natalia Nollenberger & Núria Rodríguez-Planas, 2015. "Can’t buy mommy’s love? Universal childcare and children’s long-term cognitive development," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 28(2), pages 393-422, April.
    10. anonymous, 2010. "The economic importance of being educated," Forefront, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Fall, pages 6-9.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    early childcare and education; school performance; test scores;

    JEL classification:

    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education

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