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Sarah Grace See

Personal Details

First Name:Sarah Grace
Middle Name:Cheng
Last Name:See
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pse438
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]
https://sites.google.com/site/sarahgracesee/
Twitter: @sarahgracesee

Affiliation

(97%) Faculteit Economie en Bedrijfskunde
Rijksuniversiteit Groningen

Groningen, Netherlands
http://www.rug.nl/feb/
RePEc:edi:ferugnl (more details at EDIRC)

(1%) Department of Economics and Related Studies
University of York

York, United Kingdom
http://www.york.ac.uk/economics/
RePEc:edi:deyoruk (more details at EDIRC)

(1%) Collegio Carlo Alberto
Università degli Studi di Torino

Torino, Italy
https://www.carloalberto.org/
RePEc:edi:fccaait (more details at EDIRC)

(1%) Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD)

Torino, Italy
http://www.child-centre.it/
RePEc:edi:childit (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Daniela Del Boca & Chiara Monfardini & Sarah Grace See, 2018. "Government education expenditures, pre-primary education and school performance: A cross-country analysis," Working Papers 2018-020, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  2. Francesca Luppi & Letizia Mencarini & Sarah Grace See, 2017. "The Work-Family Balance: Making Men and Women Happy," Working Papers 098, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
  3. L. Bottazzi & P. Manasse & S. G. See, 2017. "Better Wed Over the Mixen Than Over The Moor? Break-ups of Inter-Ethnic Marriages In Italy," Working Papers wp1098, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
  4. Sarah Grace See, 2013. "The Riskiest of Them All: Parental Supervision and Adolescent Behaviors," CHILD Working Papers Series 21, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.
  5. C. Monfardini & S. G. See, 2012. "Birth order and child outcomes: does maternal quality time matter?," CHILD Working Papers Series 3, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.

Articles

  1. Sarah See, 2016. "Parental supervision and adolescent risky behaviors," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 185-206, March.
  2. Chiara Monfardini & Sarah Grace See, 2016. "Birth order and child cognitive outcomes: an exploration of the parental time mechanism," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(5), pages 481-495, September.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Daniela Del Boca & Chiara Monfardini & Sarah Grace See, 2018. "Government education expenditures, pre-primary education and school performance: A cross-country analysis," Working Papers 2018-020, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

    Mentioned in:

    1. Government education expenditures, pre-primary education and school performance: A cross-country analysis
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2018-12-10 19:25:28

Working papers

  1. Daniela Del Boca & Chiara Monfardini & Sarah Grace See, 2018. "Government education expenditures, pre-primary education and school performance: A cross-country analysis," Working Papers 2018-020, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.

    Cited by:

    1. Daniela Del Boca & Noemi Oggero & Paola Profeta & Maria Cristina Rossi, 2020. "Women’s Work, Housework and Childcare, before and during COVID-19," Carlo Alberto Notebooks 613, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
    2. Del Boca, Daniela & Oggero, Noemi & Profeta, Paola & Rossi, Maria Cristina, 2020. "Women's Work, Housework and Childcare, before and during COVID-19," IZA Discussion Papers 13409, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Daniela Del Boca & Noemi Oggero & Paola Profeta & Mariacristina Rossi, 2020. "Women’s and men’s work, housework and childcare, before and during COVID-19," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 1001-1017, December.

  2. C. Monfardini & S. G. See, 2012. "Birth order and child outcomes: does maternal quality time matter?," CHILD Working Papers Series 3, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.

    Cited by:

    1. Black, Sandra & Devereux, Paul J. & Salvanes, Kjell G, 2015. "Healthy(?), Wealthy and Wise: Birth Order and Adult Health," CEPR Discussion Papers 10695, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Black, Sandra E. & Grönqvist, Erik & Öckert, Björn, 2017. "Born to Lead? The Effect of Birth Order on Non-Cognitive Abilities," IZA Discussion Papers 10560, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Makate, Marshall, 2016. "Maternal health-seeking behavior and child’s birth order: Evidence from Malawi, Uganda, and Zimbabwe," MPRA Paper 72722, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 14 Jul 2016.
    4. Björkegren, Evelina & Svaleryd, Helena, 2017. "Birth Order and Child Health," Working Paper Series 2017:16, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    5. del Bono, Emilia & Francesconi, Marco, 2014. "Early Maternal Time Investment and Early Child Outcomes," CEPR Discussion Papers 10231, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Hsing-Wen Han & Hsien-Ming Lien & Tzu-Ting Yang, 2020. "Patient Cost-Sharing and Healthcare Utilization in Early Childhood: Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 12(3), pages 238-278, August.
    7. Lehmann, Jee-Yeon K. & Nuevo-Chiquero, Ana & Vidal-Fernández, Marian, 2012. "Explaining the Birth Order Effect: The Role of Prenatal and Early Childhood Investments," IZA Discussion Papers 6755, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    8. Buckles, Kasey & Kolka, Shawna, 2014. "Prenatal investments, breastfeeding, and birth order," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 118(C), pages 66-70.
    9. Mohammad Jakaria & Rejaul Karim Bakshi & M. Mehedi Hasan, 2022. "Is maternal employment detrimental to children’s nutritional status? Evidence from Bangladesh," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 26(1), pages 85-111, February.
    10. Herbst, Chris M., 2014. "Are Parental Welfare Work Requirements Good for Disadvantaged Children? Evidence from Age-of-Youngest-Child Exemptions," IZA Discussion Papers 8485, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

Articles

  1. Sarah See, 2016. "Parental supervision and adolescent risky behaviors," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(1), pages 185-206, March.

    Cited by:

    1. Li, Chunkai & Zhang, Qiunv & Li, Na, 2018. "Does social capital benefit resilience for left-behind children? An evidence from Mainland China," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 255-262.
    2. Kalenkoski, Charlene M. & Pabilonia, Sabrina Wulff, 2021. "Parental Disability and Teenagers' Time Allocation," IZA Discussion Papers 14416, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Corman, Hope & Dave, Dhaval & Kalil, Ariel & Reichman, Nancy E., 2017. "Effects of maternal work incentives on youth crime," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 128-144.
    4. Sandra L. Hofferth & David S. Bickham & Jeanne Brooks-Gunn & Pamela E. Davis-Kean & Wei-Jun Jean Yeung, 2018. "Contributions of Research Based on the PSID Child Development Supplement," The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, , vol. 680(1), pages 97-131, November.

  2. Chiara Monfardini & Sarah Grace See, 2016. "Birth order and child cognitive outcomes: an exploration of the parental time mechanism," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(5), pages 481-495, September.

    Cited by:

    1. Enkelejda Havari & Marco Savegnago, 2022. "The intergenerational effects of birth order on education," Post-Print hal-03595676, HAL.
    2. Gerald J. Pruckner & Nicole Schneeweis & Thomas Schober & Martina Zweimüller, 2019. "Birth Order, Parental Health Investment, and Health in Childhood," CDL Aging, Health, Labor working papers 2019-01, The Christian Doppler (CD) Laboratory Aging, Health, and the Labor Market, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
    3. Mats Lillehagen & Martin Arstad Isungset, 2020. "New Partner, New Order? Multipartnered Fertility and Birth Order Effects on Educational Achievement," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(5), pages 1625-1646, October.
    4. Qing Wan & Xiaoke Cheng & Kam C. Chan & Shenghao Gao, 2021. "Born to innovate? The birth‐order effect of CEOs on corporate innovation," Journal of Business Finance & Accounting, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48(9-10), pages 1846-1888, October.
    5. Lucio Esposito & Sunil Mitra Kumar & Adrián Villaseñor, 2020. "The importance of being earliest: birth order and educational outcomes along the socioeconomic ladder in Mexico," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 33(3), pages 1069-1099, July.
    6. Handy, Christopher & Shester, Katharine, 2020. "The Effect of Birth Order on Educational Attainment among the Baby Boom Generation," MPRA Paper 102426, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Kim, Jun Hyung & Wang, Shaoda, 2021. "Birth Order Effects, Parenting Style, and Son Preference," GLO Discussion Paper Series 1007, Global Labor Organization (GLO).

More information

Research fields, statistics, top rankings, if available.

Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 6 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-EDU: Education (3) 2018-04-09 2018-04-16 2018-04-23
  2. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (2) 2012-09-16 2012-09-30
  3. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (2) 2018-04-16 2018-12-17
  4. NEP-HAP: Economics of Happiness (1) 2018-12-17
  5. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2012-09-16
  6. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (1) 2018-04-23
  7. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (1) 2018-04-23

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