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Worker-Level Consequences of Import Shocks

Author

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  • Nilsson Hakkala, Katariina

    () (Aalto University)

  • Huttunen, Kristiina

    () (Aalto University)

Abstract

We analyse the effects of imports on employment and earnings by distinguishing between import competition in final products and firms' use of imports in production (offshoring). We use Finnish worker-firm data merged with product-level trade data. We focus on Chinese imports and instrument them by changes in China's share of world exports to other EU countries. Both types of importing increase the job loss risk for all workers and, in particular, for workers in production occupations. An increase in import competition has larger negative effects than an increase in offshoring. Production workers suffer the largest earnings losses, while for high- skilled workers the wage-effect is positive.

Suggested Citation

  • Nilsson Hakkala, Katariina & Huttunen, Kristiina, 2016. "Worker-Level Consequences of Import Shocks," IZA Discussion Papers 10033, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10033
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Katrin Huber & Erwin Winkler, 2016. "All We Need is Love? Trade-Adjustment, Inequality, and the Role of the Partner," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 873, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    2. El-Sahli, Zouheir & Gullstrand, Joakim & Olofsdotter, Karin, 2017. "The Internal and External Effects of Offshoring on Job Security," Working Papers 2017:14, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    3. Pekkala Kerr, Sari & Maczulskij, Terhi & Maliranta, Mika, 2016. "Within and Between Firm Trends in Job Polarization: Role of Globalization and Technology," ETLA Working Papers 41, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    4. Tuhkuri, Joonas, 2016. "Trade and Innovation: Matched Worker-Firm-Level Evidence," ETLA Working Papers 39, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    offshoring; import competition; employment; earnings;

    JEL classification:

    • F16 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Trade and Labor Market Interactions
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • L23 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Organization of Production

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