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Do fiscal rules matter for growth?

Author

Listed:
  • António Afonso
  • João Tovar Jalles

Abstract

We study the relevance of fiscal rules for growth in an EU panel. Our results show that they foster growth, while stricter fiscal rules mitigate the adverse impact on growth from big governments. Moreover, more recent EU member states have gained from the implementation of fiscal rules.

Suggested Citation

  • António Afonso & João Tovar Jalles, 2012. "Do fiscal rules matter for growth?," Working Papers Department of Economics 2012/07, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
  • Handle: RePEc:ise:isegwp:wp072012
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    File URL: http://pascal.iseg.utl.pt/~depeco/wp/wp072012.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Peter Wierts, 2008. "How do Expenditure Rules affect Fiscal Behaviour?," DNB Working Papers 166, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    2. John C. Driscoll & Aart C. Kraay, 1998. "Consistent Covariance Matrix Estimation With Spatially Dependent Panel Data," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 80(4), pages 549-560, November.
    3. Andreas Bergh & Magnus Henrekson, 2011. "Government Size And Growth: A Survey And Interpretation Of The Evidence," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 25(5), pages 872-897, December.
    4. Cândida Ferreira, 2009. "Fiscal Behaviour in the European Union: Rules, Fiscal Decentralization and Government Indebtedness," Working Papers Department of Economics 2009/23, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    5. Roel Beetsma & Massimo Giuliodori, 2010. "Discretionary Fiscal Policy: Review and Estimates for the EU," CESifo Working Paper Series 2948, CESifo Group Munich.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sefa Awaworyi Churchill & Mehmet Ugur & Siew Ling Yew, 2017. "Does Government Size Affect Per-Capita Income Growth? A Hierarchical Meta-Regression Analysis," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 93(300), pages 142-171, March.
    2. António Afonso, & Emanuel Reis Leão, & Dilson Tiny, & Diptes C. P. Bhimjee, 2017. "Fiscal Sustainability Analysis: The Case of PALOP Economies," Working Papers Department of Economics 2017/14, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, Department of Economics, Universidade de Lisboa.
    3. Athanasios Tagkalakis, 2014. "Discretionary fiscal policy and economic activity in Greece," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, vol. 41(4), pages 687-712, November.
    4. Yang, Sungpil., 2015. "The public employment service in the Republic of Korea," ILO Working Papers 994901023402676, International Labour Organization.
    5. Alin OPREANA & Diana MIHAIU, 2012. "Fiscal policy and the optimal gdp under a budget constrain condition," Anale. Seria Stiinte Economice. Timisoara, Faculty of Economics, Tibiscus University in Timisoara, vol. 0, pages 775-782, May.
    6. Stanova, Nadja, 2015. "Fiscal discretion, growth and output volatility in new EU member countries," MPRA Paper 63946, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Ray, Nikhil. & Velasquez, Agustin. & Islam, Iyanatul., 2015. "Fiscal rules, growth and employment : a developing country perspective," ILO Working Papers 994881313402676, International Labour Organization.
    8. repec:ilo:ilowps:488131 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    fiscal rules; growth; government size; panel analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • E62 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Macroeconomic Policy, Macroeconomic Aspects of Public Finance, and General Outlook - - - Fiscal Policy
    • H60 - Public Economics - - National Budget, Deficit, and Debt - - - General

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