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Cooperation and Authoritarian Norms: An experimental study in China

  • Björn Vollan

    ()

  • Yexin Zhou

    ()

  • Andreas Landmann

    ()

  • Biliang Hu

    ()

  • Carsten Herrmann-Pillath

    ()

There is ample evidence for a “democracy premium”. Laws that have been implemented via election lead to a more cooperative behavior compared to a top-down approach. This has been observed using field data and laboratory experiments. We present evidence from Chinese students and workers who participated in public goods experiments and a value survey. We find a premium for top-down rule implementation stemming from people with stronger individual values for obeying authorities. When participants have values for obeying authorities, they even conform to non-preferred rule. Our findings provide strong evidence that the efficiency of political institutions depends on societal norms.

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Paper provided by Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck in its series Working Papers with number 2013-14.

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Length: 93
Date of creation: Jun 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:inn:wpaper:2013-14
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  1. John Godard & John T. Delaney, 2000. "Reflections on the ôhigh performanceö paradigmÆs implications for industrial relations as a field," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 53(3), pages 482-502, April.
  2. Matthias Sutter & Stefan Haigner & Martin Kocher, . "Choosing the carrot or the stick? ? Endogenous institutional choice in social dilemma situations," Working Papers 2008-07, Faculty of Economics and Statistics, University of Innsbruck.
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  4. Pedro Dal Bó & Andrew Foster & Louis Putterman, 2008. "Institutions and Behavior: Experimental Evidence on the Effects of Democracy," NBER Working Papers 13999, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Xavier Giné & Robert Townsend & James Vickery, 2008. "Patterns of Rainfall Insurance Participation in Rural India," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 22(3), pages 539-566, October.
  6. Pommerehne, Werner W & Weck-Hannemann, Hannelore, 1996. " Tax Rates, Tax Administration and Income Tax Evasion in Switzerland," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 88(1-2), pages 161-70, July.
  7. Jean-Robert Tyran & Lars P. Feld, 2005. "Achieving Compliance when Legal Sanctions are Non-Deterrent," CREMA Working Paper Series 2005-17, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
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