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Dishonesty in everyday life and its policy implications

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  • Dan Ariely
  • Nina Mazar

Abstract

Dishonest acts are all too prevalent in day-to-day life. In the current review, we examine some possible psychological causes for such dishonesty that go beyond the standard economic considerations of probability and value of external payoffs. We propose a general model of dishonest behavior that includes also internal psychological reward mechanisms for honesty and dishonesty, and we point to the implications of this model in terms of curbing dishonesty.

Suggested Citation

  • Dan Ariely & Nina Mazar, 2006. "Dishonesty in everyday life and its policy implications," Working Papers 06-3, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedbwp:06-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Keywords

    Honesty; Reward (Psychology);

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