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Deriving India's Potential growth from theory and structure

  • Ashima Goyal

    ()

    (Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research)

  • Sanchit Arora

    ()

    (Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research)

Estimates suggest that Indian aggregate supply is elastic but subject to upward shocks. If supply shocksmake a high persistent contribution to inflation, it implies second round pass through is occurring, implying growth has reached its potential. This measure of potential growth draws on both theory and the structure of the Indian economy. It turns out supply shocks largely explain inflation. Output reached potential only in the years 2007-08 when growth rates exceeded 9 percent. In the period 2010-11 there was no sustained excess of growth over potential. Inflation was due to multiple supply shocks, rather than second round effects. Estimated linear and Markov switching policy rules suggest there wasovercorrection in 2011.They show a two percent underestimate of potential output leads to a 50 basis point rise in policy rates.

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Paper provided by Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India in its series Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers with number 2012-018.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ind:igiwpp:2012-018
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  1. Ashima Goyal, 2009. "Through a Glass Darkly: Deciphering the Impact of Oil Price Shocks," Working Papers id:1826, eSocialSciences.
  2. Jon Faust & Eric M. Leeper, 1994. "When do long-run identifying restrictions give reliable results?," International Finance Discussion Papers 462, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  3. Hilde C. Bjørnland & Leif Brubakk & Anne Sofie Jore, 2006. "Forecasting inflation with an uncertain output gap," Working Paper 2006/02, Norges Bank.
  4. Ashima Goyal & Shruti Tripathi, 2012. "Stability and policy rules in emerging markets," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2012-004, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
  5. Goyal, Ashima, 2011. "A general equilibrium open economy model for emerging markets: Monetary policy with a dualistic labor market," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 1392-1404, May.
  6. Goyal, Ashima & Pujari, Ayan Kumar, 2005. "Identifying long run supply curve of India," MPRA Paper 24021, University Library of Munich, Germany.
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