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Superneutrality in postwar economies

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  • James B. Bullard
  • John W. Keating

Abstract

A structural vector autoregression is employed to estimate the real output level response to permanent inflation shocks. We identify the model by assuming that in the long run, inflation is a monetary phenomenon. Well-known economic theory is used to establish this identification restriction. The model is estimated for a sample of 16 countries from the larger pool based on data quality, existence of long uninterrupted series on output and inflation, and evidence that the country experienced permanent shocks to inflation and output. The VAR is estimated for each country separately. We find some evidence of non-superneutrality, particularly for some low inflation countries, but in general our results suggest that superneutrality describes well most of the postwar economies we study.

Suggested Citation

  • James B. Bullard & John W. Keating, 1994. "Superneutrality in postwar economies," Working Papers 1994-011, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:1994-011
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Huybens, Elisabeth & Smith, Bruce D., 1998. "Financial Market Frictions, Monetary Policy, and Capital Accumulation in a Small Open Economy," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 353-400, August.
    2. Serletis, Apostolos & Krause, David, 1996. "Empirical evidence on the long-run neutrality hypothesis using low-frequency international data," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 50(3), pages 323-327, March.

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    Keywords

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