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Microeconomic Shocks, Depreciation and Inflation: an Australian Perspective

The general equilibrium approach demonstrates that macroeconomic shocks link the exchange rate and the inflation rate through diverse transmission channels. Therefore, the one-track focus of the partial equilibrium 'pass-through' approach that predicts that exchange rate depreciation causes inflation is flawed does not explain the exchange rate inflation dynamics of post-float australia. In this paper based on a mundell-fleming stochastic rational expectations model the theoretical priors that link exogenous shocks and macro-variables such variables real exchange rate, relative prices and relative output have been identified. Thereafter, the structural var (svar) methodology has been deployed to the identify the exogenous shocks by appealing to the long-run classical neutrality postulates. The dynamic interactions between shocks and macro-variables have been empirically reviewed using innovation accounting.

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Paper provided by School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia in its series Discussion Papers Series with number 298.

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Date of creation: Jan 2002
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Handle: RePEc:qld:uq2004:298
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  1. David E. Runkle, 1987. "Vector autoregressions and reality," Staff Report 107, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  2. Ben S. Bernanke, 1986. "Alternative Explanations of the Money-Income Correlation," NBER Working Papers 1842, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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  5. Fisher, Lance A, 1996. "Sources of Exchange Rate and Price Level Fluctuations in Two Commodity Exporting Countries: Australia and New Zealand," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 72(219), pages 345-58, December.
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  10. Sven W. Arndt & J. David Richardson, 1987. "Real-Financial Linkages Among Open Economies," NBER Working Papers 2230, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Runkle, David E, 1987. "Vector Autoregressions and Reality," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 5(4), pages 437-42, October.
  12. Runkle, David E, 1987. "Vector Autoregressions and Reality: Reply," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 5(4), pages 454, October.
  13. Mussa, Michael, 1982. "A Model of Exchange Rate Dynamics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(1), pages 74-104, February.
  14. Cooley, Thomas F. & Leroy, Stephen F., 1985. "Atheoretical macroeconometrics: A critique," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 283-308, November.
  15. Johansen, Soren, 1988. "Statistical analysis of cointegration vectors," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 12(2-3), pages 231-254.
  16. Gali, Jordi, 1992. "How Well Does the IS-LM Model Fit Postwar U.S. Data," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(2), pages 709-38, May.
  17. Karim Abadir & Kaddour Hadri & Elias Tzavalis, . "The Influence of VAR Dimensions on Estimator Biases," Discussion Papers 96/14, Department of Economics, University of York.
  18. Paul Krugman, 1986. "Pricing to Market when the Exchange Rate Changes," NBER Working Papers 1926, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  19. Dornbusch, Rudiger, 1976. "Expectations and Exchange Rate Dynamics," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(6), pages 1161-76, December.
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