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Oligopolistic Equilibrium and Financial Constraints

Author

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  • Beviá, Carmen

    (Universidad de Alicante, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona and Barcelona GSE)

  • Corchón, Luis C.

    (Universidad Carlos III de Madrid)

  • Yasuda, Yosuke

    (Osaka University)

Abstract

We provide a model of dynamic duopoly in which firms face financial constraints and disappear when they are unable to fulfill them. We show that, in some cases, Cournot outputs are no longer supported in equilibrium, because if these outputs were set, a firm may have incentives to ruin the other. In these cases, standard grim-trigger strategies in which collusion is sustained by infinite reversion to Cournot outputs cannot be used. We show that there is a stationary Markov equilibrium in mixed strategies where predation occurs with a positive probability. We also obtain a modified "folk theorem". We show that any bankruptcy-free outputs (outputs in which no firm can drive another firm to bankruptcy without becoming bankrupt itself) that attain individually rational profits (reflecting bankruptcy consideration) can be supported by a subgame perfect Nash equilibrium when firms are sufficiently long-sighted.

Suggested Citation

  • Beviá, Carmen & Corchón, Luis C. & Yasuda, Yosuke, 2015. "Oligopolistic Equilibrium and Financial Constraints," Economics Series 316, Institute for Advanced Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:ihs:ihsesp:316
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    File URL: http://www.ihs.ac.at/publications/eco/es-316.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bolton, Patrick & Scharfstein, David S, 1990. "A Theory of Predation Based on Agency Problems in Financial Contracting," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(1), pages 93-106, March.
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    5. Fudenberg, Drew & Maskin, Eric, 1986. "The Folk Theorem in Repeated Games with Discounting or with Incomplete Information," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 54(3), pages 533-554, May.
    6. Partha Dasgupta & Eric Maskin, 1986. "The Existence of Equilibrium in Discontinuous Economic Games, I: Theory," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(1), pages 1-26.
    7. Roth, David, 1996. "Rationalizable Predatory Pricing," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 68(2), pages 380-396, February.
    8. Bernanke, Ben & Gertler, Mark, 1989. "Agency Costs, Net Worth, and Business Fluctuations," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 79(1), pages 14-31, March.
    9. repec:dgr:rugsom:01e15 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Giancarlo Spagnolo, 2000. "Stock-Related Compensation and Product-Market Competition," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 31(1), pages 22-42, Spring.
    11. Partha Dasgupta & Eric Maskin, 1986. "The Existence of Equilibrium in Discontinuous Economic Games, II: Applications," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(1), pages 27-41.
    12. Cabral, Luis M B & Riordan, Michael H, 1994. "The Learning Curve, Market Dominance, and Predatory Pricing," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 62(5), pages 1115-1140, September.
    13. Milgrom, Paul & Roberts, John, 1982. "Predation, reputation, and entry deterrence," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 280-312, August.
    14. Kawakami, Toshikazu & Yoshihiro, Yoshida, 1997. "Collusion under financial constraints: Collusion or predation when the discount factor is near one?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 175-178, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. Etienne Billette de Villemeur & Laurent Flochel & Bruno Versaevel, 2013. "Optimal collusion with limited liability," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, vol. 9(3), pages 203-227, September.
    2. Marjit, Sugata & Mukherjee, Arijit & Yang, Lei, 2014. "On the Sustainability of Product Market Collusion under Credit Market Imperfection," MPRA Paper 60832, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Sugata Marjit & Arijit Mukherjee & Lei Yang, 2016. "Sustainabnility of Product Market Collusion under Credit Market Imperfections," CESifo Working Paper Series 6292, CESifo Group Munich.
    4. Flochel, Laurent & Versaevel, Bruno & de Villemeur, Étienne, 2009. "Optimal Collusion with Limited Liability and Policy Implications," IDEI Working Papers 547, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse, revised Jul 2011.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Financial Constraints; Bankruptcy; Firm Behavior; Dynamic Games;

    JEL classification:

    • D2 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations
    • D4 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design
    • L1 - Industrial Organization - - Market Structure, Firm Strategy, and Market Performance
    • L2 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior

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