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Sub-National Revenue Mobilization in Latin American and Caribbean Countries: The Case of Argentina


  • Daniel Artana
  • Sebastian Auguste
  • Marcela Cristini
  • Cynthia Moskovitz
  • Ivana Templado


This paper analyzes sub-national revenues in Argentina. Following a discussion of the recent evolution of government revenues and their vertical imbalance, the paper then analyzes the most important taxes collected by federal, provincial and local governments. Subsequently considered are the determinants of sub-national revenues and the impact of the 2001-2002 crisis. It is found that automatic transfers improve collections of the cascade sales tax and the property tax by enlarging the disposable income of the private and public sector of the provinces favored by the regional redistribution of income, while discretionary transfers reduce own-source revenue effort and encourage public investment. The paper concludes by analyzing options to improve sub-national revenue mobilization and offering specific proposals, particularly in regard to improving the cascade provincial sales tax.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel Artana & Sebastian Auguste & Marcela Cristini & Cynthia Moskovitz & Ivana Templado, 2012. "Sub-National Revenue Mobilization in Latin American and Caribbean Countries: The Case of Argentina," Research Department Publications 4765, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  • Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4765

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    1. van Doorslaer, Eddy & Gerdtham, Ulf-G., 2003. "Does inequality in self-assessed health predict inequality in survival by income? Evidence from Swedish data," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 57(9), pages 1621-1629, November.
    2. Christopher J.L. Murray & Alan D. Lopez, 2000. "Progress and directions in refining the Global Burden of Disease approach: a response to Williams," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 9(1), pages 69-82.
    3. Christopher J. Ruhm, 2000. "Are Recessions Good for Your Health?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(2), pages 617-650.
    4. Fabrice Etilé & Carine Milcent, 2006. "Income-related reporting heterogeneity in self-assessed health: evidence from France," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(9), pages 965-981.
    5. Angus Deaton, 2010. "Income, Aging, Health and Well-Being around the World: Evidence from the Gallup World Poll," NBER Chapters,in: Research Findings in the Economics of Aging, pages 235-263 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Lindeboom, Maarten & van Doorslaer, Eddy, 2004. "Cut-point shift and index shift in self-reported health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 23(6), pages 1083-1099, November.
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    8. repec:aph:ajpbhl:1982:72:8:800-808_7 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Vicente Fretes Cibils & Teresa Ter-Minassian & J. Sebastián Scrofina & Federico Ortega & Germán Ríos & Alejandro Rasteletti & Arturo Ramírez Verdugo & Emilio Pineda & Jorge Martínez-Vázquez & Cristián, 2015. "Decentralizing Revenue in Latin America: Why and How (Executive Summary)," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 88387 edited by Vicente Fretes Cibils & Teresa Ter-Minassian, February.
    2. Karelys Guzmán-Finol & Ana María Estrada-Jabela, 2016. "Los gobiernos departamentales y la inversión de regalías en Colombia: Un análisis descriptivo, 2012 - 2015," REVISTA ECONOMÍA & REGIÓN, UNIVERSIDAD TECNOLÓGICA DE BOLÍVAR, vol. 10(1), pages 119-163, June.
    3. repec:idb:idbbks:6829 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Richard M. Bird, 2013. "Below the Salt: Decentralizing Value-Added Taxes," International Center for Public Policy Working Paper Series, at AYSPS, GSU paper1302, International Center for Public Policy, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • H71 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - State and Local Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue
    • H77 - Public Economics - - State and Local Government; Intergovernmental Relations - - - Intergovernmental Relations; Federalism

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