IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ibt/wpaper/wp022019.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Added Worker Effect, Employment Contracts, and the Reasons for the Wife’s Inactivity

Author

Listed:
  • Jan Gromadzki

Abstract

The recent literature provide compelling evidence of the existence of a significant added worker effect (AWE) - wives increase their labour supply in response to the job displacement of their husbands. However, little is known about the heterogeneity of the effect. I study the variation in the AWE depending on the reasons for the wife’s inactivity, and on the husband’s employment contract type. I find that the responses of discouraged women to the job displacement of their husbands were three times as strong as the responses of those women, who were inactive for reasons of health and family. This finding suggests that discouraged people are highly responsive to the income shocks that occur within a household. In addition, I find that the size of the AWE also depends on the type of employment contract the husband had. The results suggest that high employment protection reduces the wife’s incentives to join the labour force after her husband’s job displacement.

Suggested Citation

  • Jan Gromadzki, 2019. "The Added Worker Effect, Employment Contracts, and the Reasons for the Wife’s Inactivity," IBS Working Papers 02/2019, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
  • Handle: RePEc:ibt:wpaper:wp022019
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ibs.org.pl//app/uploads/2019/02/IBS_Working_Paper_02_2019.pdf
    File Function: English Version
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Martin Halla & Julia Schmieder & Andrea Weber, 2020. "Job Displacement, Family Dynamics, and Spousal Labor Supply," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 12(4), pages 253-287, October.
    2. Stephen R. G. Jones & W. Craig Riddell, 1999. "The Measurement of Unemployment: An Empirical Approach," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 67(1), pages 147-162, January.
    3. Matthew Gray & Alexandra Heath & Boyd Hunter, 2005. "The Labour Force Dynamics Of The Marginally Attached," Australian Economic Papers, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(1), pages 1-14, March.
    4. Ortigueira, Salvador & Siassi, Nawid, 2013. "How important is intra-household risk sharing for savings and labor supply?," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(6), pages 650-666.
    5. Sinem H. Ayhan, 2018. "Married women’s added worker effect during the 2008 economic crisis—The case of Turkey," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 767-790, September.
    6. Mankart, Jochen & Oikonomou, Rigas, 2016. "The rise of the added worker effect," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 143(C), pages 48-51.
    7. Julia Bredtmann & Sebastian Otten & Christian Rulff, 2018. "Husband’s Unemployment and Wife’s Labor Supply: The Added Worker Effect across Europe," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 71(5), pages 1201-1231, October.
    8. Massimo Baldini & Costanza Torricelli & Maria Cesira Urzì Brancati, 2018. "Family ties: Labor supply responses to cope with a household employment shock," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 809-832, September.
    9. Emanuela Ghignoni & Alina Verashchagina, 2016. "Added worker effect during the Great Recession: evidence from Italy," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 37(8), pages 1264-1285, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Nezih Guner & Yuliya Kulikova & Arnau Valladares-Esteban, 2020. "Does the Added Worker Effect Matter?," Working Papers wp2020_2001, CEMFI.
    2. Lina Cardona‐Sosa & Luz Adriana Flórez & Leonardo Fabio Morales & Banco de la República, 2018. "How does the Household Labour Supply Respond to the Unemployment of the Household Head?," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 32(4), pages 174-212, December.
    3. Serdar Birinci, 2019. "Spousal Labor Supply Response to Job Displacement and Implications for Optimal Transfers," Working Papers 2019-020, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, revised Jan 2020.
    4. Aysit Tansel & Zeynel Abidin Ozdemir, 2018. "Unemployment invariance hypothesis, added and discouraged worker effects in Canada," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 39(7), pages 929-936, October.
    5. Krusell, Per & Mukoyama, Toshihiko & Rogerson, Richard & Sahin, Aysegül, 2011. "A three state model of worker flows in general equilibrium," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 146(3), pages 1107-1133, May.
    6. Daniel Fackler & Eva Weigt, 2020. "Who Buffers Income Losses after Job Displacement? The Role of Alternative Income Sources, the Family, and the State," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 34(3), pages 239-276, September.
    7. Toshihiko Mukoyama & Richard Rogerson & Aysegul Sahin & Per Krusell, 2009. "Labor supply in a frictional labor market," 2009 Meeting Papers 54, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    8. Aysit Tansel & Zeynel Abidin Ozdemir, 2016. "Unemployment Invariance Hypothesis, Added and Discouraged Worker Effects in Canada?," ERC Working Papers 1717, ERC - Economic Research Center, Middle East Technical University, revised Dec 2017.
    9. Schone, Pal & Strom, Marte, 2019. "International Labor Market Competition and Spousal Labor Supply Responses," IZA Discussion Papers 12857, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    10. Matías Ciaschi, 2020. "Job loss and household labor supply adjustments in developing countries: Evidence from Argentina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0271, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    11. Martin Halla & Julia Schmieder & Andrea Weber, 2020. "Job Displacement, Family Dynamics, and Spousal Labor Supply," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 12(4), pages 253-287, October.
    12. Pauline Halchuk, 2006. "Measuring employment outcomes for Indigenous Australians," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 9(2), pages 201-215, June.
    13. Ayça Akarçay Gürbüz & Sezgin Polat & Mustafa Ulus, 2014. "In Limbo: Exploring Transition to Discouragement," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 26(4), pages 527-551, September.
    14. Scott Baum & William Mitchell, 2010. "Labour Underutilisation and Gender: Unemployment Versus Hidden-Unemployment," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 29(2), pages 233-248, April.
    15. Robert Breunig & Joseph Mercante, 2010. "The Accuracy of Predicted Wages of the Non‐Employed and Implications for Policy Simulations from Structural Labour Supply Models," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 86(272), pages 49-70, March.
    16. Juan J. Dolado & Cecilia Garcia-Peñalosa & Linas Tarasonis, 2019. "The changing nature of gender selection into employment over the Great Recession," Bank of Lithuania Working Paper Series 58, Bank of Lithuania.
    17. Ipek Ilkkaracan & Haluk Levent & Sezgin Polat, 2013. "Exploring different measures of wage flexibility in a developing economy context: the case for Turkey," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(3), pages 297-315, May.
    18. Timo Baas & Farzaneh Shamsfakhr, 2017. "Times of crisis and female labor force participation - Lessons from the Spanish flu," EcoMod2017 10313, EcoMod.
    19. Lina Cardona-Sosa & Luz Adriana Flórez & Leonardo Morales Zurita, 2016. "Intra-household labour supply after an unemployment event: The added worker effect," Borradores de Economia 944, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    20. Jochen Mankart & Rigas Oikonomou, 2017. "Household Search and the Aggregate Labour Market," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 84(4), pages 1735-1788.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    added worker effect; labour supply; discouraged workers; employment protection; self-employment;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts
    • J82 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Standards - - - Labor Force Composition

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ibt:wpaper:wp022019. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (IBS). General contact details of provider: https://edirc.repec.org/data/ibswapl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.