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Peers’ Parents and Educational Attainment: The Exposure Effect

Author

Listed:
  • Bobby Chung

    (Clemson University)

Abstract

This paper discusses the `exposure effect' in child development by investigating the extent to which the educational background of peers' parents is related to a child's future college attainment. I analyze the friendship networks of a nationally representative sample of high-school students in the US. To address endogenous friendship formation, I adopt two distinct strategies: a selection correction approach and exploiting within-school cohort variations in parental compositions. I find that peers' academic performance and other observed characteristics, with a rich set of control variables and network fixed effect, do not fully explain the spillover from peers' parents of the same gender. Effects are more prominent for students with a disadvantaged background (those with less-educated parents, single-mother households, and less caring fathers, e.g.). Suggestive evidence is provided to support the role model effect as a plausible channel.

Suggested Citation

  • Bobby Chung, 2018. "Peers’ Parents and Educational Attainment: The Exposure Effect," Working Papers 2018-086, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:hka:wpaper:2018-086
    Note: ECI
    as

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    File URL: http://humcap.uchicago.edu/RePEc/hka/wpaper/Chung_2018_peers-parents-educational-attainment.pdf
    File Function: First version, November 3, 2018
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    File URL: http://humcap.uchicago.edu/RePEc/hka/wpaper/Chung_2018_peers-parents-educational-attainment_v2_2020.pdf
    File Function: This version, March 13, 2020
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sandra E. Black & Paul J. Devereux & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2013. "Under Pressure? The Effect of Peers on Outcomes of Young Adults," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 31(1), pages 119-153.
    2. Francesco Avvisati & Marc Gurgand & Nina Guyon & Eric Maurin, 2014. "Getting Parents Involved: A Field Experiment in Deprived Schools," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 81(1), pages 57-83.
    3. Patrick Bayer & Fernando Ferreira & Robert McMillan, 2007. "A Unified Framework for Measuring Preferences for Schools and Neighborhoods," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115(4), pages 588-638, August.
    4. Paul Goldsmith-Pinkham & Guido W. Imbens, 2013. "Social Networks and the Identification of Peer Effects," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 31(3), pages 253-264, July.
    5. Robert Garlick, 2018. "Academic Peer Effects with Different Group Assignment Policies: Residential Tracking versus Random Assignment," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 10(3), pages 345-369, July.
    6. Scott E. Carrell & Bruce I. Sacerdote & James E. West, 2013. "From Natural Variation to Optimal Policy? The Importance of Endogenous Peer Group Formation," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 81(3), pages 855-882, May.
    7. Kim-Sau Chung, 2000. "Role Models and Arguments for Affirmative Action," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(3), pages 640-648, June.
    8. Thomas S. Dee, 2007. "Teachers and the Gender Gaps in Student Achievement," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(3).
    9. Eric Chyn, 2018. "Moved to Opportunity: The Long-Run Effects of Public Housing Demolition on Children," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 108(10), pages 3028-3056, October.
    10. Eric P. Bettinger & Bridget Terry Long, 2005. "Do Faculty Serve as Role Models? The Impact of Instructor Gender on Female Students," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 152-157, May.
    11. Patacchini, Eleonora & Rainone, Edoardo & Zenou, Yves, 2017. "Heterogeneous peer effects in education," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 134(C), pages 190-227.
    12. Chih‐Sheng Hsieh & Lung Fei Lee, 2016. "A Social Interactions Model with Endogenous Friendship Formation and Selectivity," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(2), pages 301-319, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    peers' parents; social interactions; college attainment; childhood exposure;

    JEL classification:

    • C11 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Bayesian Analysis: General
    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J10 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - General

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