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Human Capital Inequality: Empirical Evidence

Author

Listed:
  • Brant Abbott

    (University of British Columbia)

  • Giovanni Gallipoli

    (University of British Columbia)

Abstract

Wealth inequality has received considerable attention, with mounting evidence of steady and economically meaningful changes in the concentration of wealth ownership. By definition, wealth inequality captures disparity in the ownership of productive capital and other non-labor factors of production. In contrast, in this article we focus on the distribution of human capital and its implications for the accrual of economic resources to individuals and households. Human capital inequality can be thought of as measuring disparity in the ownership of labor factors of production, which are usually compensated in the form of wage income.

Suggested Citation

  • Brant Abbott & Giovanni Gallipoli, 2018. "Human Capital Inequality: Empirical Evidence," Working Papers 2018-085, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  • Handle: RePEc:hka:wpaper:2018-085
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    File URL: http://humcap.uchicago.edu/RePEc/hka/wpaper/Abbott_Gallipoli_2018_human-capital-inequality.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Human Capital Inequality: Empirical Evidence
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2019-04-01 18:18:16

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    1. Giovanni Gallipoli & Brant Abbott, 2017. ""Permanent Income" Inequality," 2017 Meeting Papers 1033, Society for Economic Dynamics.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inequality; wealth distribution; human capital;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • D31 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Personal Income and Wealth Distribution
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

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