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The Effectiveness Of Vocational Versus General Secondary Education: Evidence From Pisa 2012 For Countries With Early Trackin

Author

Listed:
  • Julia Kuzmina

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics.)

  • Martin Carnoy

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics.)

Abstract

In this paper, we examine the relative academic effectiveness of vocational education in three countries with early tracking systems: Austria, Croatia and Hungary. Our measures of academic effectiveness are the results of an international test, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s (OECD’s) Program of International Student Assessment (PISA). Our results show few, if any, differences between students attending the vocational track in secondary school and those in the academic track. Specifically, the results show that attending the vocational or academic track results in similar achievement gains in the 10th grade

Suggested Citation

  • Julia Kuzmina & Martin Carnoy, 2015. "The Effectiveness Of Vocational Versus General Secondary Education: Evidence From Pisa 2012 For Countries With Early Trackin," HSE Working papers WP BRP 23/EDU/2015, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hig:wpaper:23edu2015
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    File URL: http://www.hse.ru/data/2015/02/06/1092012242/23EDU2015.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    7. Prashant Loyalka & Xiaoting Huang & Linxiu Zhang & Jianguo Wei & Hongmei Yi & Yingquan Song & Yaojiang Shi & James Chu, 2016. "The Impact of Vocational Schooling on Human Capital Development in Developing Countries: Evidence from China," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 30(1), pages 143-170.
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    12. Dronkers Jaap & Velden Rolf van der & Dunne Allison, 2011. "The effects of educational systems, school-composition, track-level, parental background and immigrants’ origins on the achievement of 15-years old native and immigrant students. A reanalysis of PIS," ROA Research Memorandum 006, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    academic effectiveness; tracking; vocational education; PISA;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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