IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hhs/cesisp/0409.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Increasing Wage Gap, Spatial Structure and Market Access: Evidence from Swedish Micro Data

Author

Listed:
  • Nabavi, Pardis

    () (CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies, Royal Institute of Technology)

Abstract

The new economic geography predicts that the wage gap will increase with accessibility to markets but does not consider the impact of spatial proximity. In contrast, urban economic theory explains wage differences by density without accounting for accessibility. Using a rich Swedish micro-panel, we empirically examine the two rival theories for males and females separately, controlling for individual, firm and regional characteristics. The regression results indicate that wage dispersion is correlated with both accessibility to markets and density. However, the urban economic theory has greatest explanatory power when we control for factors such as occupation, ethnical background, skill, firm size, technical change, ownership, commuting time, unobserved heterogeneity and spatial autocorrelation.

Suggested Citation

  • Nabavi, Pardis, 2015. "Increasing Wage Gap, Spatial Structure and Market Access: Evidence from Swedish Micro Data," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 409, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:cesisp:0409
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: https://static.sys.kth.se/itm/wp/cesis/cesiswp409.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Oskar Nordström Skans & Per-Anders Edin & Bertil Holmlund, 2009. "Wage Dispersion Between and Within Plants: Sweden 1985-2000," NBER Chapters,in: The Structure of Wages: An International Comparison, pages 217-260 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Bernard Fingleton & Simonetta Longhi, 2013. "The Effects Of Agglomeration On Wages: Evidence From The Micro-Level," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(3), pages 443-463, August.
    3. Pierre Philippe Combes & GillesDuranton & Henry G.Overman, 2005. "Agglomeration And The Adjustment Of The Spatial Economy," DOCUMENTOS CEDE 001953, UNIVERSIDAD DE LOS ANDES-CEDE.
    4. Rachel Griffith, 1999. "Using the ARD establishment level data to look at foreign ownership and productivity in the UK," IFS Working Papers W99/06, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    5. Kelejian, Harry H & Prucha, Ingmar R, 1998. "A Generalized Spatial Two-Stage Least Squares Procedure for Estimating a Spatial Autoregressive Model with Autoregressive Disturbances," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 17(1), pages 99-121, July.
    6. Paulo Guimarães & Pedro Portugal, 2010. "A simple feasible procedure to fit models with high-dimensional fixed effects," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 10(4), pages 628-649, December.
    7. Griffith, Rachel, 1999. "Using the ARD Establishment Level Data to Look at Foreign Ownership and Productivity in the United Kingdom," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(456), pages 416-442, June.
    8. Pierre-Philippe Combes & Gilles Duranton & Laurent Gobillon, 2011. "The identification of agglomeration economies," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 253-266, March.
    9. Redding, Stephen & Venables, Anthony J., 2004. "Economic geography and international inequality," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 53-82, January.
    10. Edward L. Glaeser & Joshua D. Gottlieb, 2009. "The Wealth of Cities: Agglomeration Economies and Spatial Equilibrium in the United States," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 47(4), pages 983-1028, December.
    11. Steven Brakman & Harry Garretsen & Charles van Marrewijk, 2009. "Economic Geography Within And Between European Nations: The Role Of Market Potential And Density Across Space And Time," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(4), pages 777-800.
    12. Ciccone, Antonio & Hall, Robert E, 1996. "Productivity and the Density of Economic Activity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(1), pages 54-70, March.
    13. Larsson, Johan P., 2013. "The Neighborhood or the Region? Untangling the density-productivity relationship using geocoded data," Working Paper Series in Economics and Institutions of Innovation 318, Royal Institute of Technology, CESIS - Centre of Excellence for Science and Innovation Studies.
    14. Bernard Fingleton, 2011. "The empirical performance of the NEG with reference to small areas," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 267-279, March.
    15. Anthony J. Venables, 2011. "Productivity in cities: self-selection and sorting," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 241-251, March.
    16. Brown, Charles, 1988. "Minimum Wage Laws: Are They Overrated?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 2(3), pages 133-145, Summer.
    17. Satya Das, 2005. "Gradual globalization and inequality between and within countries," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 38(3), pages 852-869, August.
    18. Bernard Fingleton, 2003. "Increasing returns: evidence from local wage rates in Great Britain," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 55(4), pages 716-739, October.
    19. Harry Garretsen & Ron Martin, 2011. "The Journal of Economic Geography a decade on: where do we go from here?," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 207-213, March.
    20. Combes, Pierre-Philippe & Duranton, Gilles & Gobillon, Laurent, 2008. "Spatial wage disparities: Sorting matters!," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(2), pages 723-742, March.
    21. Daron Acemoglu, 2002. "Technical Change, Inequality, and the Labor Market," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(1), pages 7-72, March.
    22. Pierre Philippe Combes & Gilles Duranton & Henry G. Overman, 2005. "Agglomeration and the adjustment of the spatial economy-super-§," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 84(3), pages 311-349, August.
    23. Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano, 2011. "'New' new economic geography: firm heterogeneity and agglomeration economies," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(2), pages 231-240, March.
    24. Johan Larsson, 2014. "The neighborhood or the region? Reassessing the density–wage relationship using geocoded data," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 52(2), pages 367-384, March.
    25. David M. Drukker & Ingmar Prucha & Rafal Raciborski, 2013. "Maximum likelihood and generalized spatial two-stage least-squares estimators for a spatial-autoregressive model with spatial-autoregressive disturbances," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 13(2), pages 221-241, June.
    26. Kapoor, Mudit & Kelejian, Harry H. & Prucha, Ingmar R., 2007. "Panel data models with spatially correlated error components," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 140(1), pages 97-130, September.
    27. Martin Andersson & Johan Klaesson & Johan P Larsson, 2014. "The sources of the urban wage premium by worker skills: Spatial sorting or agglomeration economies?," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 93(4), pages 727-747, November.
    28. Jagdish N. Bhagwati, 2004. "In Defense of Globalization: It Has a Human Face," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, vol. 94(6), pages 9-20, November-.
    29. Moulton, Brent R, 1990. "An Illustration of a Pitfall in Estimating the Effects of Aggregate Variables on Micro Unit," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 72(2), pages 334-338, May.
    30. Börje Johansson & Johan Klaesson & Michael Olsson, 2003. "Commuters’ non-linear response to time distances," Journal of Geographical Systems, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 315-329, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    New economic geography; urban economics; spatial econometrics; micro panel data;

    JEL classification:

    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hhs:cesisp:0409. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Vardan Hovsepyan). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/cekthse.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.