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Decreased tracking, increased earning: Evidence from the comprehensive Polish educational reform of 1999

Author

Listed:
  • Luca Flóra Drucker

    (ELTE Department of Economics and Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences)

  • Daniel Horn

    (Centre for Economic and Regional Studies, Hungarian Academy of Sciences and ELTE Department of Economics)

Abstract

The Polish educational reform in 1999 is often considered successful as the results of the Polish students, and especially that of the low-performers, on the OECD PISA tests have improved significantly since the introduction of the new system. The reform extended the previous 8-year undivided comprehensive education to 9 years, core curricula were introduced and the examination, admission and assessment systems were changed. It has been argued before that this longer comprehensive education improved the test performance of worse performing students; hence increasing average performance and decreasing inter-school variation of test scores. However, the lack of reliable impact assessment on long-run labour market effects of this reform is awaiting. In this paper, we aim to fill this gap by looking at the causal effects of the reform. By comparing the labour market outcomes of the pre- and post-reform cohorts, we find a non-negligible and positive effect. We look at employment and wages as outcomes. Using data from the EU-Statistics on Income and Living conditions, and pooling the waves between 2005 and 2013 and taking the 20-27 year-olds, we generate a quasi-panel of observations to estimate the treatment effect by difference-in-difference estimation. We find evidence that the reform was successful on the long-run: the post-reform group is more likely to be employed and they also earn higher wages. On average, the treatment group is around 2-3% more likely to be employed, which effect is driven by the lowest educated. The post-reform cohort also earns more: we find an over 3% difference in real wages, which is also more pronounced for the lowest educated.

Suggested Citation

  • Luca Flóra Drucker & Daniel Horn, 2016. "Decreased tracking, increased earning: Evidence from the comprehensive Polish educational reform of 1999," Budapest Working Papers on the Labour Market 1602, Institute of Economics, Centre for Economic and Regional Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:has:bworkp:1602
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Maciej Jakubowski, 2008. "Implementing Value-Added Models of School Assessment," RSCAS Working Papers 2008/06, European University Institute.
    2. Illoong Kwon & Eva Meyersson Milgrom & Seiwoon Hwang, 2010. "Cohort Effects in Promotions and Wages: Evidence from Sweden and the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 45(3).
    3. Pekkarinen, Tuomas & Uusitalo, Roope & Kerr, Sari, 2009. "School tracking and intergenerational income mobility: Evidence from the Finnish comprehensive school reform," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(7-8), pages 965-973, August.
    4. Maciej Jakubowski, 2015. "Opening up opportunities: education reforms in Poland," IBS Policy Papers 01/2015, Instytut Badan Strukturalnych.
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    Cited by:

    1. Jacek Liwiński & Francesco Pastore, 2021. "Are School-Provided Skills Useful at Work? Results of the Wiles Test," Research in Higher Education, Springer;Association for Institutional Research, vol. 62(1), pages 72-97, February.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    education reform; Poland; detracking; labor market; difference-in-difference;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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