IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/han/dpaper/dp-636.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Social Accounting Matrix: A user manual for village economies

Author

Listed:
  • Gronau, Steven
  • Winter, Etti

Abstract

The application of Social Accounting Matrices (SAM) is well established at the national level and provides a comprehensive economic framework. The procedure for developing national SAMs is extensively documented in literature. However, it can also be constructed for smaller economies, such as a village. Studies dealing with village SAMs are rare. In addition, there are hardly any guidelines for design. This gap will be addressed in this paper, which provides a manual for the construction of a village SAM. Theoretical principles and data requirements are discussed. A hypothetical village SAM is constructed by using numerical examples. Subsequently, the SAM of a real-world village case study from Zambia is analyzed. It is demonstrated how macroeconomic indicators can be calculated and microeconomic information obtained. Furthermore, a village SAM provides the database for scientific modelling approaches which are presented. Village SAMs are thus a useful management tool and support policy planning at local and regional level.

Suggested Citation

  • Gronau, Steven & Winter, Etti, 2018. "Social Accounting Matrix: A user manual for village economies," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-636, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
  • Handle: RePEc:han:dpaper:dp-636
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://diskussionspapiere.wiwi.uni-hannover.de/pdf_bib/dp-636.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Lewis, Blane D. & Thorbecke, Erik, 1992. "District-level economic linkages in Kenya: Evidence based on a small regional social accounting matrix," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 20(6), pages 881-897, June.
    2. Parikh, Alka & Thorbecke, Erik, 1996. "Impact of Rural Industrialization on Village Life and Economy: A Social Accounting Matrix Approach," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 44(2), pages 351-377, January.
    3. Gelan, Ayele & Engida, Ermias & Caria, A. Stefano & Karugia, Joseph T., 2012. "Integrating livestock in the CAADP framework: Policy analysis using a dynamic computable general equilibrium model for Ethiopia [Research note]:," ESSP research notes 13, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Channing Arndt & William Farmer & Kenneth Strzepek & James Thurlow, 2012. "Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security in Tanzania," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 16(3), pages 378-393, August.
    5. repec:taf:deveza:v:34:y:2017:i:3:p:276-294 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Dan S. Rickman, 2010. "Modern Macroeconomics And Regional Economic Modeling," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 23-41, February.
    7. Luc Savard, 2003. "Poverty and Income Distribution in a CGE-Household Micro-Simulation Model: Top-Down/Bottom Up Approach," Cahiers de recherche 0343, CIRPEE.
    8. Mark Partridge & Dan Rickman, 2010. "Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) Modelling for Regional Economic Development Analysis," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(10), pages 1311-1328.
    9. Hartono, Djoni & Resosudarmo, Budy P., 2008. "The economy-wide impact of controlling energy consumption in Indonesia: An analysis using a Social Accounting Matrix framework," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 36(4), pages 1404-1419, April.
    10. Faße, Anja & Winter, Etti & Grote, Ulrike, 2014. "Bioenergy and rural development: The role of agroforestry in a Tanzanian village economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 106(C), pages 155-166.
    11. de Janvry, Alain & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 2010. "The Global Food Crisis and Guatemala: What Crisis and for Whom?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(9), pages 1328-1339, September.
    12. Sherman Robinson & Andrea Cattaneo & Moataz El-Said, 2001. "Updating and Estimating a Social Accounting Matrix Using Cross Entropy Methods," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 47-64.
    13. Robinson, Sherman & Yunez-Naude, Antonio & Hinojosa-Ojeda, Raul & Lewis, Jeffrey D. & Devarajan, Shantayanan, 1999. "From stylized to applied models:: Building multisector CGE models for policy analysis," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 10(1), pages 5-38.
    14. Steven Haggblade & Jeffrey Hammer & Peter Hazell, 1991. "Modeling Agricultural Growth Multipliers," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 73(2), pages 361-374.
    15. Jon Barnes & James MacGregor & Olimpio Nhuleipo & Petrus Muteyauli, 2010. "The value of Namibia's forest resources: Preliminary economic asset and flow accounts," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(2), pages 159-176.
    16. Angelsen, Arild & Jagger, Pamela & Babigumira, Ronnie & Belcher, Brian & Hogarth, Nicholas J. & Bauch, Simone & Börner, Jan & Smith-Hall, Carsten & Wunder, Sven, 2014. "Environmental Income and Rural Livelihoods: A Global-Comparative Analysis," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(S1), pages 12-28.
    17. Xinshen Diao & Adam Kennedy, 2016. "Economywide Impact of Maize Export Bans on Agricultural Growth and Household Welfare in Tanzania: A Dynamic Computable General Equilibrium Model Analysis," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 34(1), pages 101-134, January.
    18. Jeffrey Round, 2003. "Constructing SAMs for Development Policy Analysis: Lessons Learned and Challenges Ahead," Economic Systems Research, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(2), pages 161-183.
    19. Rutherford, Thomas F., 1995. "Extension of GAMS for complementarity problems arising in applied economic analysis," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 19(8), pages 1299-1324, November.
    20. Diao, Xinshen & Fekadu, Belay & Haggblade, Steven & Seyoum Taffesse, Alemayehu & Wamisho, Kassu & Yu, Bingxin, 2007. "Agricultural growth linkages in Ethiopia: Estimates using fixed and flexible price models," IFPRI discussion papers 695, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    21. Ravallion, Martin & Chen, Shaohua, 2007. "China's (uneven) progress against poverty," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 1-42, January.
    22. Subramanian, Shankar & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 1990. "The Transmission of Production Fluctuations and Technical Change in a Village Economy: A Social Accounting Matrix Approach," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 39(1), pages 131-173, October.
    23. United Nations, 2014. "System of Environmental-Economic Accounting 2012," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 23959, September.
    24. Böhringer, Christoph & Rutherford, Thomas F., 2005. "Integrating Bottom-Up into Top-Down: A Mixed Complementarity Approach," ZEW Discussion Papers 05-28, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    25. Frank Ackerman & Kevin Gallagher, 2008. "The Shrinking Gains from Global Trade Liberalization in Computable General Equilibrium Models: A Critical Assessment," International Journal of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(1), pages 50-77.
    26. Subramanian, Arjunan & Qaim, Matin, 2009. "Village-wide Effects of Agricultural Biotechnology: The Case of Bt Cotton in India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 256-267, January.
    27. Dasgupta, Susmita & Deichmann, Uwe & Meisner, Craig & Wheeler, David, 2005. "Where is the Poverty-Environment Nexus? Evidence from Cambodia, Lao PDR, and Vietnam," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 617-638, April.
    28. Haggblade, Steven & Hazell, Peter, 1989. "Agricultural technology and farm-nonfarm growth linkages," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 3(4), pages 345-364, December.
    29. Gelan, Ayele & Engida, Ermias & Caria, A. Stefano & Karugia, Joseph T., 2012. "Integrating livestock in the CAADP framework: Policy analysis using a dynamic computable general equilibrium model for Ethiopia:," ESSP working papers 34, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Social accounting matrix; user manual; village economies; management tool; policy planning;

    JEL classification:

    • A33 - General Economics and Teaching - - Multisubject Collective Works - - - Handbooks
    • E16 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models - - - Social Accounting Matrix
    • O21 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Development Planning and Policy - - - Planning Models; Planning Policy
    • R58 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - Regional Development Planning and Policy

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:han:dpaper:dp-636. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Heidrich, Christian). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/fwhande.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.