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Modeling Agricultural Growth Multipliers

Author

Listed:
  • Steven Haggblade
  • Jeffrey Hammer
  • Peter Hazell

Abstract

Agriculture's potential as an engine of third world growth depends, in large part, on the size of the production and consumption linkages it stimulates in rural regions. Current estimates of agricultural growth multipliers within rural regions vary widely, not only because economic structures differ across regions but also because the array of fixed-price models most commonly used embody widely differing basic assumptions. Among fixed-price models, the semi-input-output formulation projects the most plausible multipliers. But even they overstate the magnitude of growth multipliers by 10% to 25% according to the price-endogenous model developed here.

Suggested Citation

  • Steven Haggblade & Jeffrey Hammer & Peter Hazell, 1991. "Modeling Agricultural Growth Multipliers," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 73(2), pages 361-374.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:ajagec:v:73:y:1991:i:2:p:361-374.
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.2307/1242720
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    Cited by:

    1. Mateusz J. Filipski & J. Edward Taylor & Karen E. Thome & Benjamin Davis, 2015. "Effects of treatment beyond the treated: a general equilibrium impact evaluation of Lesotho's cash grants program," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 46(2), pages 227-243, March.
    2. Garbero, A. & Marion, P., 2018. "IFAD RESEARCH SERIES 28 - Understanding the dynamics of adoption decisions and their poverty impacts: the case of improved maize seeds in Uganda," IFAD Research Series 280077, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD).
    3. Christiaensen, Luc & Demery, Lionel & Kuhl, Jesper, 2006. "The role of agriculture in poverty reduction an empirical perspective," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4013, The World Bank.
    4. Paul Dorosh & Abdul Salam, 2008. "Wheat Markets and Price Stabilisation in Pakistan: An Analysis of Policy Options," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 47(1), pages 71-87.
    5. Adu-Baffour, Ferdinand & Daum, Thomas & Birner, Regina, 2018. "Can Big Companies’ Initiatives to Promote Mechanization Benefit Small Farms in Africa? A Case Study from Zambia," Discussion Papers 273521, University of Bonn, Center for Development Research (ZEF).
    6. Gronau, Steven & Winter, Etti, 2018. "Social Accounting Matrix: A user manual for village economies," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-636, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    7. Son, Vien Nguyen & Schinckus, Christophe & Chong, Felicia, 2017. "A post-Marxist approach in development finance: PMF or production mutualisation fund model applied to agriculture," Research in International Business and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 94-104.
    8. Ray D. Bollman & Shon M. Ferguson, 2019. "The Local Impacts of Agricultural Subsidies: Evidence from the Canadian Prairies," Journal of Agricultural Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(2), pages 507-528, June.
    9. Diao, Xinshen & Fekadu, Belay & Haggblade, Steven & Seyoum Taffesse, Alemayehu & Wamisho, Kassu & Yu, Bingxin, 2007. "Agricultural growth linkages in Ethiopia: Estimates using fixed and flexible price models," IFPRI discussion papers 695, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Olawumi Abeni Osundina & Festus Victor Bekun & Dervis Kirikkaleli & Mary Oluwatoyin Agboola, 2019. "Does the twin growth catalyst of oil rent seeking and agriculture exhibit complementary or substitute role? New perspective from a West African country," Letters in Spatial and Resource Sciences, Springer, vol. 12(3), pages 187-197, December.
    11. Delgado, Christopher L. & Hopkins, Jane & Kelly , Valerie & Hazell, P. B. R. & McKenna, Anna A. & Gruhn, Peter & Hojjati, Behjat & Sil, Jayashree & Courbois, Claude, 1998. "Agricultural growth linkages in Sub-Saharan Africa:," Research reports 107, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    12. Zhang, Yumei & Diao, Xinshen, 2020. "The changing role of agriculture with economic structural change – The case of China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 62(C).
    13. Ligon, Ethan & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 2018. "Estimating the Relative Benefits of Agricultural Growth on the Distribution of Expenditures," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 417-428.
    14. Mellor, John W. & Malik, Sohail J., 2017. "The Impact of Growth in Small Commercial Farm Productivity on Rural Poverty Reduction," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 1-10.
    15. Mellor, John W. & Dorosh, Paul A., 2010. "Agriculture and the economic transformation of Ethiopia," ESSP working papers 10, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    16. Arega D. Alene & Abebe Menkir & S. O. Ajala & B. Badu‐Apraku & A. S. Olanrewaju & V. M. Manyong & Abdou Ndiaye, 2009. "The economic and poverty impacts of maize research in West and Central Africa," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(5), pages 535-550, September.
    17. Mellor, J., 2018. "Recent findings about agriculture and the economic transformation," 2018 Conference, July 28-August 2, 2018, Vancouver, British Columbia 276971, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    18. Maureen Kilkenny & Mark D. Partridge, 2009. "Export Sectors and Rural Development," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 91(4), pages 910-929.

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