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Monetary Policy Rules in Central and Eastern Europe

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  • Frömmel, Michael
  • Schobert, Franziska

Abstract

We estimate monetary policy rules for six central and eastern European countries (CEEC) by taking changes in the policy settings explicitly into account. Distinguishing rather fixed and more flexible exchange rate arrangements we find that for most countries exchange rates played an important role in monetary policy during the fixed exchange rate regime, whereas their influence disappears after the introduction of floating exchange rate regimes. This indicates that most countries followed their officially announced policy settings. For Slovenia and to some extent for Romania, however, we find evidence for exchange rate targeting, although they officially announced a managed float.

Suggested Citation

  • Frömmel, Michael & Schobert, Franziska, 2006. "Monetary Policy Rules in Central and Eastern Europe," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-341, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
  • Handle: RePEc:han:dpaper:dp-341
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Jorge Restrepo & Carlos Garcia & Mr. Scott Roger, 2009. "Hybrid Inflation Targeting Regimes," IMF Working Papers 2009/234, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Demir, İshak, 2014. "Monetary policy responses to the exchange rate: Empirical evidence from the ECB," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 39(C), pages 63-70.
    3. Josef Arlt & Martin Mandel, 2014. "The Reaction Function of Three Central Banks of Visegrad Group," Prague Economic Papers, Prague University of Economics and Business, vol. 2014(3), pages 269-289.
    4. Mackiewicz-Łyziak Joanna, 2017. "Monetary Policy in Poland – How the Financial Crisis Changed the Central Bank’s Preferences," Financial Internet Quarterly (formerly e-Finanse), Sciendo, vol. 13(1), pages 15-24, November.
    5. Ghatak, Subrata & Moore, Tomoe, 2008. "Monetary policy rules for transition economies: an empirical analysis," Economics Discussion Papers 2008-5, School of Economics, Kingston University London.
    6. Garcia, Carlos J. & Restrepo, Jorge E. & Roger, Scott, 2011. "How much should inflation targeters care about the exchange rate?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(7), pages 1590-1617.
    7. Vašíček, Bořek, 2012. "Is monetary policy in the new EU member states asymmetric?," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 235-263.
    8. Josef Arlt & Martin Mandel, 2012. "Je možné předpovídat repo sazbu ČNB na základě zpět hledícího měnového pravidla? [Is it Possible to Predict the CNB Repo Rate on the Basis of the Backward-Looking Monetary Rule?]," Politická ekonomie, Prague University of Economics and Business, vol. 2012(4), pages 484-504.
    9. POPESCU Iulian Vasile, 2013. "Monetary Policy Rules For European Monetary Union Acceding Countries," Studies in Business and Economics, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 8(2), pages 108-122, August.
    10. Jens Klose, 2019. "Are Eastern European Taylor Reaction Functions Asymmetric in Inflation or Output? Empirical Evidence for Four Countries," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 57(1), pages 31-49, January.
    11. Carlos García & Jorge Restrepo & Scott Roger, 2009. "Hybrid Inflation Targeting Regimes," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 533, Central Bank of Chile.
    12. Ziegler, Christina, 2012. "Monetary policy under alternative exchange rate regimes in Central and Eastern Europe," Working Papers 104, University of Leipzig, Faculty of Economics and Management Science.
    13. Borek Vasicek, 2010. "Monetary Policy Rules and Inflation Processes in Open Emerging Economies," Eastern European Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(4), pages 36-58, January.
    14. Martin Feldkircher & Florian Huber & Isabella Moder, 2016. "Modeling the evolution of monetary policy rules in CESEE," Focus on European Economic Integration, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank), issue 1, pages 8-27.
    15. Sek, Siok Kun, 2008. "Interactions between monetary policy and exchange rate in inflation targeting emerging countries: the case of three East Asian countries," MPRA Paper 12034, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 09 Dec 2008.
    16. Shesadri Banerjee, 2013. "Inflation Volatility and Activism of Monetary Policy," CEGAP Working Papers 2013_06, Durham University Business School.
    17. Jiang, Chun & Jian, Na & Liu, Tie-Ying & Su, Chi-Wei, 2016. "Purchasing power parity and real exchange rate in Central Eastern European countries," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 349-358.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    monetary policy; Taylor rule; transition economies; CEEC; inflation targeting; interest rate policy;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • P20 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - General

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