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Impact of information on intentions to vaccinate in a potential epidemic : swine-origin Influenza A (H1N1)

Author

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  • Olivier Chanel

    () (GREQAM - Groupement de Recherche en Économie Quantitative d'Aix-Marseille - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - AMU - Aix Marseille Université - ECM - École Centrale de Marseille - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Stéphane Luchini

    () (GREQAM - Groupement de Recherche en Économie Quantitative d'Aix-Marseille - EHESS - École des hautes études en sciences sociales - AMU - Aix Marseille Université - ECM - École Centrale de Marseille - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Sébastien Massoni

    () (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

  • Jean-Christophe Vergnaud

    () (CES - Centre d'économie de la Sorbonne - UP1 - Université Panthéon-Sorbonne - CNRS - Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique)

Abstract

Vaccination campaigns to prevent the spread of epidemics are successful only if the targeted populations subscribe to the recommendations of health authorities. However, because compulsory vaccination is hardly conceivable in modern democracies, governments need to convince their populations through efficient and persuasive information campaigns. In the context of the swine-origin A (H1N1) 2009 pandemic, we use an interactive study among the general public in the South of France, with 175 participants, to explore what type of information can induce change in vaccination intentions at both aggregate and individual levels. We find that individual attitudes to vaccination are based on rational appraisal of the situation, and that it is information of a purely scientific nature that has the only significant positive effect on intention to vaccinate.

Suggested Citation

  • Olivier Chanel & Stéphane Luchini & Sébastien Massoni & Jean-Christophe Vergnaud, 2010. "Impact of information on intentions to vaccinate in a potential epidemic : swine-origin Influenza A (H1N1)," Post-Print halshs-00543821, HAL.
  • Handle: RePEc:hal:journl:halshs-00543821
    Note: View the original document on HAL open archive server: https://halshs.archives-ouvertes.fr/halshs-00543821
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mark Gersovitz & Jeffrey S. Hammer, 2004. "The Economical Control of Infectious Diseases," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 114(492), pages 1-27, January.
    2. Corso, Phaedra S & Hammitt, James K & Graham, John D, 2001. "Valuing Mortality-Risk Reduction: Using Visual Aids to Improve the Validity of Contingent Valuation," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 23(2), pages 165-184, September.
    3. Geoffard, Pierre-Yves & Philipson, Tomas, 1997. "Disease Eradication: Private versus Public Vaccination," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(1), pages 222-230, March.
    4. Olivier Chanel & Graciela Chichilnisky, 2009. "The influence of fear in decisions: Experimental evidence," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 271-298, December.
    5. Olivier Chanel & Susan Cleary & Stephane Luchini, 2006. "Does public opinion influence willingness-to-pay? Evidence from the field," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(13), pages 821-824.
    6. Boulier Bryan L. & Datta Tejwant S. & Goldfarb Robert S, 2007. "Vaccination Externalities," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 7(1), pages 1-27, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. Björkman, Ingeborg & Sanner, Margareta A., 2013. "The Swedish A(H1N1) vaccination campaign—Why did not all Swedes take the vaccination?," Health Policy, Elsevier, vol. 109(1), pages 63-70.
    2. Yaqub, Ohid & Castle-Clarke, Sophie & Sevdalis, Nick & Chataway, Joanna, 2014. "Attitudes to vaccination: A critical review," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 1-11.
    3. Ami, Dominique & Aprahamian, Frédéric & Chanel, Olivier & Luchini, Stéphane, 2018. "When do social cues and scientific information affect stated preferences? Insights from an experiment on air pollution," Journal of choice modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 33-46.
    4. Peretti-Watel, Patrick & Raude, Jocelyn & Sagaon-Teyssier, Luis & Constant, Aymery & Verger, Pierre & Beck, François, 2014. "Attitudes toward vaccination and the H1N1 vaccine: Poor people's unfounded fears or legitimate concerns of the elite?," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 109(C), pages 10-18.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    France; experiment; interactive; information; vaccination; influenza A (H1N1); attitudes.; Expérience; grippe A;

    JEL classification:

    • A - General Economics and Teaching

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