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Evolution of trade patterns and economic performance:the case of France and Switzerland during the nineteenth century

Listed author(s):
  • Léo CHARLES

Using two original databases, built from external trade statistic of France and Switzerland, this article uses a highly disaggregated product-level to analyze the type, the nature and the dynamic of French and Swiss specialization. Despite of differences between France and Switzerland in terms of economic environment, this article underlines some common trends regarding the three aspects of specialization. For instance, the article shows that intra-industry trade flows were occurring between both countries and their partners. The articles also emphasizes that the skilled labor force as well as the choice of a ‘right’ economic policy allowed Switzerland to adapt its comparative advantage structure to the world demand, and to enjoy a fast economic growth.

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File URL: http://cahiersdugretha.u-bordeaux4.fr/2015/2015-28.pdf
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Paper provided by Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée in its series Cahiers du GREThA with number 2015-28.

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Date of creation: 2015
Handle: RePEc:grt:wpegrt:2015-28
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  1. Bela Balassa, 1965. "Tariff Protection in Industrial Countries: An Evaluation," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 73, pages 573-573.
  2. Quah, Danny, 1993. "Empirical cross-section dynamics in economic growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 426-434, April.
  3. Pierre Villa & Frédéric Busson, 1997. "Croissance et spécialisation," Revue Économique, Programme National Persée, vol. 48(6), pages 1457-1483.
  4. Ricardo Hausmann & Jason Hwang & Dani Rodrik, 2007. "What you export matters," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 12(1), pages 1-25, March.
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  10. Dalum, Bent & Laursen, Keld & Verspagen, Bart, 1999. "Does Specialization Matter for Growth?," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(2), pages 267-288, June.
  11. Moritz Schularick & Solomos Solomou, 2011. "Tariffs and economic growth in the first era of globalization," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 33-70, March.
  12. Bertrand Blancheton & Stéphane Bécuwe & Léo Charles, 2013. "Les grandes tendances du commerce extérieur de la France pendant la première mondialisation," Post-Print hal-01134772, HAL.
  13. Thornton, John & Molyneux, Philip, 1997. "Tariff endogeneity: Evidence from 19th century Europe," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 56(3), pages 345-350, November.
  14. Lampe, Markus, 2009. "Effects of Bilateralism and the MFN Clause on International Trade: Evidence for the Cobden-Chevalier Network, 1860-1875," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 69(04), pages 1012-1040, December.
  15. L. Charles, 2013. "Le "miracle suisse": une analyse des spécialisations industrielles (1885-1905)," Economies et Sociétés (Serie 'Histoire Economique Quantitative'), Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), issue 47, pages 1605-1620, Septembre.
  16. Michele Alessandrini & Michael Enowbi Batuo, 2010. "The trade specialization of SANE: Evidence from manufacturing industries," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 7(1), pages 145-178, June.
  17. Quah, Danny T., 1996. "Empirics for economic growth and convergence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 1353-1375, June.
  18. Arnaud Bourgain & Paolo Guarda & Patrice Pieretti, 2000. "Dynamique de la croissance et spécialisation: analyse en panel des branches industrielles," Brussels Economic Review, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles, vol. 167, pages 275-298.
  19. Shorrocks, A F, 1978. "The Measurement of Mobility," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 46(5), pages 1013-1024, September.
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