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Overall Specialization and Income: Countries Diversity

Author

Listed:
  • Luca De Benedictis

    (Università di Macerata)

  • Marco Gallegati

    (Università Politecnica delle Marche)

  • Massimo Tamberi

    (Università Politecnica delle Marche)

Abstract

This paper gives evidence to a stylized fact often disregarded in international trade empir- ics: countries' diversification. In the last fifteen years, the growth of world trade coexisted with the tendency of countries to reduce the specialization of their export composition along the development path. On average, countries do not specialize, they diversify. Our semiparametric empirical analysis shows how this result is robust to the use of different statistical indexes used to measure trade specialization to the level of sectoral aggrega- tion and to the level of smoothing in the nonparametric term associated to income per capita. Using a General Additive Model (GAM) with country-specific fixed-effect, we show that, controlling for countries heterogeneity, sectoral export diversification increases with income.

Suggested Citation

  • Luca De Benedictis & Marco Gallegati & Massimo Tamberi, 2006. "Overall Specialization and Income: Countries Diversity," Working Papers 37-2006, Macerata University, Department of Finance and Economic Sciences, revised Oct 2008.
  • Handle: RePEc:mcr:wpdief:wpaper00037
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    13. Luca De Benedictis & Marco Gallegati & Massimo Tamberi, 2007. "Semiparametric analysis of the specialization-income relationship," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(4), pages 301-306.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Aleksandra Parteka, 2010. "Employment and export specialisation along the development path: some robust evidence," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 145(4), pages 615-640, January.
    2. Cabral, Manuel Heredia Caldeira & Veiga, Paula, 2010. "Determinants Of Export Diversification And Sophistication In Sub-Saharan Africa," FEUNL Working Paper Series wp550, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Faculdade de Economia.
    3. João Amador & Sónia Cabral & José R. Maria, 2007. "Export Specialization Over the Last Four Decades: How Does Portugal Compare With Other Cohesion Countries?," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    4. Jorge Braga de Macedo & Luís Brites Pereira, 2014. "Cape Verde and Mozambique as Development Successes in West and Southern Africa," NBER Chapters,in: African Successes, Volume IV: Sustainable Growth, pages 203-293 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Aleksandra Parteka & Massimo Tamberi, 2013. "What Determines Export Diversification in the Development Process? Empirical Assessment," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(6), pages 807-826, June.
    6. Jyrki Ali-Yrkkö & Neil Foster-McGregor & Doris Hanzl-Weiss & Petri Rouvinen & Timo Seppälä & Robert Stehrer & Roman Stöllinger & Pekka Ylä-Anttila, 2011. "Trade in Intermediate Products and EU Manufacturing Supply Chains," wiiw Research Reports 369, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    7. João Amador & Sónia Cabral & José R. Maria, 2007. "International Trade Patterns over the Last Four Decades: How does Portugal Compare with other Cohesion Countries?," Working Papers w200714, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Nonparametrics; International Trade; Specialization;

    JEL classification:

    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • F10 - International Economics - - Trade - - - General

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