IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/ekd/008007/8552.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Asymmetric influence of distance on french international trade 1850-1913

Author

Listed:
  • Stephane Becuwe
  • Bertrand Blancheton
  • Leo Charles
  • Matthieu Clement

Abstract

This article uses a new database to test the influence of distance on French international trade during the first globalization to test the influence of distance on French international trade during the first globalization Using a gravity model methodology, we study exports and imports separately to better underline opposing trends in the two flows. As expected, distance has a globally negative impact on trade. For imports the negative impact decreases over time, however for exports the negative impact strengthens. If French imports fit well with the literature on transaction costs, developments in exports tell a different story. Despite a fall in transaction costs France had some difficulty in exporting to distant emerging countries at the end of the nineteenth century. These results suggest a bad geographical diversification of exports.

Suggested Citation

  • Stephane Becuwe & Bertrand Blancheton & Leo Charles & Matthieu Clement, 2015. "Asymmetric influence of distance on french international trade 1850-1913," EcoMod2015 8552, EcoMod.
  • Handle: RePEc:ekd:008007:8552
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ecomod.net/system/files/Becuwe.AIDV3_.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. James E. Anderson & Eric van Wincoop, 2003. "Gravity with Gravitas: A Solution to the Border Puzzle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 93(1), pages 170-192, March.
    2. Markus Lampe, 2011. "Explaining nineteenth‐century bilateralism: economic and political determinants of the Cobden–Chevalier network," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 64(2), pages 644-668, May.
    3. Stéphane BECUWE (GREThA, CNRS, UMR 5113) & Bertrand BLANCHETON (GREThA, CNRS, UMR 5113), 2012. "The dispersion of customs tariffs in France between 1850 and 1913: discrimination in trade policy," Cahiers du GREThA 2012-13, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    4. Huberman, Michael & Meissner, Christopher M. & Oosterlinck, Kim, 2017. "Technology and Geography in the Second Industrial Revolution: New Evidence from the Margins of Trade," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 77(01), pages 39-89, March.
    5. Boriss Siliverstovs & Dieter Schumacher, 2009. "Estimating gravity equations: to log or not to log?," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 36(3), pages 645-669, June.
    6. Mayer, Thierry & Zignago, Soledad, 2006. "Notes on CEPII’s distances measures," MPRA Paper 26469, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Jean-François Brun & Céline Carrère & Patrick Guillaumont & Jaime de Melo, 2015. "Has Distance Died? Evidence from a Panel Gravity Model," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Developing Countries in the World Economy, chapter 13, pages 299-320 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    8. Temin, Peter, 1997. "Two Views of the British Industrial Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(01), pages 63-82, March.
    9. Jacks, David S., 2009. "On the death of distance and borders: Evidence from the nineteenth century," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 105(3), pages 230-233, December.
    10. Jacks, David S. & Meissner, Christopher M. & Novy, Dennis, 2011. "Trade booms, trade busts, and trade costs," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 83(2), pages 185-201, March.
    11. J. M. C. Santos Silva & Silvana Tenreyro, 2006. "The Log of Gravity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(4), pages 641-658, November.
    12. Joakim Westerlund & Fredrik Wilhelmsson, 2009. "Estimating the gravity model without gravity using panel data," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(6), pages 641-649.
    13. Stephen Tokarick, 2006. "Does Import Protection Discourage Exports?," IMF Working Papers 06/20, International Monetary Fund.
    14. James Foreman-Peck (ed.), 1998. "Historical Foundations of Globalization," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 1355, February.
    15. Béatrice Dedinger, 2012. "The Franco-German trade puzzle: an analysis of the economic consequences of the Franco-Prussian war," Economic History Review, Economic History Society, vol. 65(3), pages 1029-1054, August.
    16. A. Broder, 2013. "Le commerce de la France et de l'Allemagne avec le cône sud de l'Amérique Latine: Argentine et Brésil 1880-1914. Causes et moyens d'une évolution inversée," Economies et Sociétés (Serie 'Histoire Economique Quantitative'), Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), issue 47, pages 1491-1514, Septembre.
    17. Philippe Guillaumet, 2002. "Les relations commerciales entre la France et l'Europe depuis 1850. Impact sur la croissance économique de la France," Revue de l'OFCE, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 82(3), pages 49-82.
    18. repec:eme:rehizz:s0363-3268(2014)0000030004 is not listed on IDEAS
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    France; Trade issues; Growth;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ekd:008007:8552. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Theresa Leary). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ecomoea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.