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Growth dynamics and conditional convergence among Chinese provinces: a panel data investigation using system GMM estimator

  • Céline BONNEFOND

The paper aims at contributing to the debate on conditional convergence across Chinese provinces by using the most recent techniques of dynamics panel data models. The analysis covers twenty nine Chinese provinces from 1995 to 2009 and is based on the estimation of growth equations using system GMM estimator. Three main results can be drawn from the empirical investigations conducted as part of this study. First, investment in physical capital and education have played an important role in promoting economic growth and may be considered as mean of reducing regional disparities. Second, the hypothesis of conditional convergence is verified over the period 1995-2009. Third, the speed of convergence is found to be faster during the period 2004-2009, which indicates that Chinese provinces have converged more quickly over the most recent period. We suggest that this result may be a consequence of the implementation of regional development programs during the 2000s, and that it may also reflect the existence of growth spillover effects.

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File URL: http://cahiersdugretha.u-bordeaux4.fr/2013/2013-23.pdf
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Paper provided by Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée in its series Cahiers du GREThA with number 2013-23.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:grt:wpegrt:2013-23
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