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Aspirations in rural Pakistan: An empirical analysis

  • Kosec, Katrina
  • Hameed, Madeeha
  • Hausladen, Stephanie

To examine aspirations in rural Pakistan, we carried out an aspirations module with almost 5,000 individuals as part of a comprehensive household survey. Using respondents’ answers to questions about their aspirations in four dimensions (income, wealth, education, and social status), we constructed an index similar to those used by Beaman et al. (2012) and Bernard and Seyoum Taffesse (2012) to measure aspirations levels. Specifically, respondents were asked to report the level of personal income they would like to achieve, the level (value) of assets they would like to achieve, the level of education they would like a child of their same gender to achieve (re-coded as desired years of education), and the level of social status they would like to achieve (on a 10-step ladder of possibilities). An individual’s index score is increasing in their desired levels of achievement in these four dimensions

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Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series PSSP working papers with number 9.

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Date of creation: 2012
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Handle: RePEc:fpr:psspwp:9
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  1. Macours, Karen & Vakis, Renos, 2009. "Changing households'investments and aspirations through social interactions : evidence from a randomized transfer program," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5137, The World Bank.
  2. Thomas DeLeire & Margo Coleman, 2000. "An Economic Model of Locus of Control and the Human Capital Investment Decision," Working Papers 0019, Harris School of Public Policy Studies, University of Chicago.
  3. Dixon, Huw David, 2000. "Keeping up with the Joneses: competition and the evolution of collusion," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 223-238, October.
  4. Bernard, Tanguy & Dercon, Stefan & Taffesse, Alemayehu Seyoum, 2012. "Beyond fatalism: An empirical exploration of self-efficacy and aspirations failure in Ethiopia:," ESSP working papers 46, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Bernard, Tanguy & Taffesse, Alemayehu Seyoum, 2012. "Measuring aspirations: discussion and example from Ethiopia:," IFPRI discussion papers 1190, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. T. Borgers & R. Sarin, 2010. "Naïve Reinforcement Learning With Endogenous Aspirations," Levine's Working Paper Archive 381, David K. Levine.
  7. Robert Jensen, 2007. "The Digital Provide: Information (Technology), Market Performance, and Welfare in the South Indian Fisheries Sector," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(3), pages 879-924.
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