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Millions of Opportunities: An Agenda for Research in Emerging Markets

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  • Rajesh Chandy

    ()

  • Om Narasimhan

    ()

Abstract

Much of the growth and much of the change that is happening in the world today is happening in emerging markets. In this article, we offer some evidence to suggest that the changes that are happening in emerging markets today are unprecedented—in scale, scope, and speed—in human history. We highlight some of the opportunities that exist for academic research on emerging markets phenomena and argue that a single construct underlies many of these opportunities: compressed change. We present a research agenda that focuses on two phenomena that are pervasive in emerging markets but rarely studied rigorously in developed markets: marketing by micro-entrepreneurs and consumption by marginalized populations. These phenomena offer researchers in marketing the opportunity to study new outcome variables as well as new explanatory variables. Moreover, they offer researchers the ability to link explanatory variables to outcome variables cleanly and in a manner that facilitates identification of causality. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Suggested Citation

  • Rajesh Chandy & Om Narasimhan, 2015. "Millions of Opportunities: An Agenda for Research in Emerging Markets," Customer Needs and Solutions, Springer;Institute for Sustainable Innovation and Growth (iSIG), vol. 2(4), pages 251-263, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:custns:v:2:y:2015:i:4:p:251-263
    DOI: 10.1007/s40547-015-0055-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hermosilla, Manuel & Gutierrez-Navratil, Fernanda & Prieto-Rodriguez, Juan, 2017. "Can Emerging Markets Tilt Global Product Design? Impacts of Chinese Colorism on Hollywood Castings," MPRA Paper 82040, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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