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Where is an oil shock?

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  • Kristie M. Engemann
  • Michael T. Owyang
  • Howard J. Wall

Abstract

Much of the literature examining the effects of oil shocks asks the question “What is an oil shock?” and has concluded that oil-price increases are asymmetric in their effects on the US economy. That is, sharp increases in oil prices affect economic activity adversely, but sharp decreases in oil prices have no effect. We reconsider the directional symmetry of oil-price shocks by addressing the question Where is an oil shock? , the answer to which reveals a great deal of spatial/directional asymmetry across states. Although most states have typical responses to oil-price shocks—they are affected by positive shocks only—the rest experience either negative shocks only (5 states), both positive and negative shocks (5 states), or neither shock (5 states).

Suggested Citation

  • Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang & Howard J. Wall, 2011. "Where is an oil shock?," Working Papers 2011-016, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlwp:2011-016
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang & Howard J. Wall, 2014. "Where Is An Oil Shock?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2), pages 169-185, March.
    2. Arora, Vipin & Gomis-Porqueras, Pedro & Shi, Shuping, 2013. "The divergence between core and headline inflation: Implications for consumers’ inflation expectations," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 38(PB), pages 497-504.
    3. Claudio Morana, 2013. "The Oil Price-Macroeconomy Relationship Since the Mid-1980s: A Global Perspective," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 3).
    4. Laura Cueppers & Dieter Smeets, 2015. "How Do Oil Price Changes Affect German Stock Returns?," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 5(1), pages 321-334.
    5. Arlan Brucal & Michael J. Roberts, 2018. "Not All Regions Are Alike: Evaluating the Effect of Oil Price Shocks on Local and Aggregate Economies," Working Papers 2018-4, University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaii at Manoa.
    6. Arlan Brucal & Michael J. Roberts, 2018. "Not All Regions Are Alike: Evaluating the Effect of Oil Price Shocks on Local and Aggregate Economies," Working Papers 2018-4, University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaii at Manoa.
    7. Monica Dudian & Mihaela Mosora & Cosmin Mosora & Stefanija Birova, 2017. "Oil Price and Economic Resilience. Romania’s Case," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(2), pages 1-8, February.
    8. Nnaemeka Vincent Emodi & Kyung-Jin Boo, 2015. "Sustainable Energy Development in Nigeria: Overcoming Energy Poverty," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 5(2), pages 580-597.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Petroleum industry and trade ; Power resources - Prices;

    JEL classification:

    • C31 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models; Quantile Regressions; Social Interaction Models
    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • E37 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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