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Oil Price and Economic Resilience. Romania’s Case

Listed author(s):
  • Monica Dudian

    ()

    (The Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Piața Romană 6, 010374 București, Romania)

  • Mihaela Mosora

    ()

    (The Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Piața Romană 6, 010374 București, Romania)

  • Cosmin Mosora

    ()

    (The Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Piața Romană 6, 010374 București, Romania)

  • Stefanija Birova

    ()

    (The Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Piața Romană 6, 010374 București, Romania)

Registered author(s):

    The emerging economies that do not face fiscal, monetary and foreign debt pressures can use the savings generated by lower oil prices for investments in order to generate economic growth. Hence, there is no doubt that the oil price affects the economy’s resilience to shocks. The importance of this impact derives from the magnitude of the price change and its diffusion within the economy. Moreover, the sustainability of any company and of the economy as a whole is subject to the availability and the price of the energy resources. The cost of these resources is an important variable used in the majority of the models regarding the assessment of sustainable development. Therefore, this article examines the impact of the oil price changes on industrial production in Romania. We found that, similar to other countries, in Romania, the growth rate of industrial production responds more strongly to a rise in oil prices. Thus, the oil Brent price has an asymmetric effect on the production evolution. This finding suggests that macroeconomic stabilization is more difficult to achieve when the oil price rises.

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    Article provided by MDPI, Open Access Journal in its journal Sustainability.

    Volume (Year): 9 (2017)
    Issue (Month): 2 (February)
    Pages: 1-8

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    Handle: RePEc:gam:jsusta:v:9:y:2017:i:2:p:273-:d:90389
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