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What do we know about oil prices and state economic performance?

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  • David A. Penn

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  • David A. Penn, 2006. "What do we know about oil prices and state economic performance?," Regional Economic Development, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Oct, pages 131-139.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedlrd:y:2006:i:oct:p:131-139:n:v.2no.2
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    File URL: http://research.stlouisfed.org/publications/red/2006/02/Penn.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Hamilton, James D., 2003. "What is an oil shock?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 113(2), pages 363-398, April.
    2. Yash P. Mehra & Jon D. Petersen, 2005. "Oil prices and consumer spending," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, vol. 91(Sum), pages 51-70.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang & Howard J. Wall, 2014. "Where Is An Oil Shock?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2), pages 169-185, March.
    2. Mark C. Snead, 2009. "Are the energy states still energy states?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, vol. 94(Q IV), pages 43-68.
    3. Shekar Shetty & Zahid Iqbal & Mansour Alshamali, 2013. "Energy Price Shocks and Economic Activity in Texas Cities," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 41(4), pages 371-383, December.

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