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Kristie M. Engemann

Personal Details

First Name:Kristie
Middle Name:M.
Last Name:Engemann
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pen65
[This author has chosen not to make the email address public]

Affiliation

Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

St. Louis, Missouri (United States)
http://www.stlouisfed.org/


(314)444-8753
P.O. Box 442, St. Louis, MO 63166
RePEc:edi:frbslus (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang & Howard J. Wall, 2011. "Where is an oil shock?," Working Papers 2011-016, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  2. Kristie M. Engemann & Kevin L. Kliesen & Michael T. Owyang, 2010. "Do oil shocks drive business cycles? some U.S. and international evidence," Working Papers 2010-007, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  3. Kristie M. Engemann & Howard J. Wall, 2009. "The effects of recessions across demographic groups," Working Papers 2009-052, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  4. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2007. "Whatever happened to the business cycle? a Bayesian analysis of jobless recoveries," Working Papers 2007-013, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

Articles

  1. Kristie M. Engemann & Ruben Hernandez-Murillo & Michael T. Owyang, 2011. "Regional aggregation in forecasting: an application to the Federal Reserve’s Eighth District," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 93(May), pages 207-222.
  2. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2010. "Unconventional oil production: stuck in a rock and a hard place," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jul, pages 14-15.
  3. Engemann, Kristie M. & Owyang, Michael T., 2010. "Whatever Happened To The Business Cycle? A Bayesian Analysis Of Jobless Recoveries," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(5), pages 709-726, November.
  4. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2010. "Not your father's oil shock," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  5. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2010. "When do recessions begin and end?," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  6. Kristie M. Engemann & Howard J. Wall, 2010. "The effects of recessions across demographic groups," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 92(Jan), pages 1-26.
  7. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2010. "Business cycle measures," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
  8. Michelle T. Armesto & Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2010. "Forecasting with mixed frequencies," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 92(Nov), pages 521-536.
  9. Kristie M. Engemann, 2009. "Retraining displaced U.S. workers," Liber8 Economic Information Newsletter, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Sept.
  10. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2009. "A winning combination? economic theory meets sports," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jan, pages 10-13.
  11. Kristie M. Engemann & Howard J. Wall, 2009. "A journal ranking for the ambitious economist," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 91(May), pages 127-140.
  12. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2008. "Extra credit: the rise of short-term liabilities," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Apr, pages 12-13.
  13. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang & Sarah Zubairy, 2008. "A primer on the empirical identification of government spending shocks," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 90(Mar), pages 117-132.
  14. Kristie M. Engemann, 2008. "U.S. farm subsidies," Liber8 Economic Information Newsletter, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Sept.
  15. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2008. "Splitsville: the economics of unilateral divorce," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jan, pages 12-16.
  16. Riccardo DiCecio & Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang & Christopher H. Wheeler, 2008. "Changing trends in the labor force: a survey," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 90(Jan), pages 47-62.
  17. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2007. "Look who's still working now," National Economic Trends, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jun.
  18. Kristie M. Engemann & Howard J. Wall, 2007. "Louisville's job growth lags on many fronts," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jan, pages 1-16.
  19. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2007. "What are the chances?," National Economic Trends, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Nov.
  20. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2007. "Working hard or hardly working? the evolution of leisure in the United States," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jan, pages 10-11.
  21. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2006. "What's in a name? reconciling conflicting evidence on ethnic names," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jan, pages 10-11.
  22. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2006. "Social changes lead married women into labor force," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Apr, pages 10-11.
  23. Kristie M. Engemann & Howard J. Wall, 2006. "Slow and steady in St. Louis," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Oct, pages 1-16.
  24. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2006. "Barreling down the road to recession?," National Economic Trends, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Sep.
  25. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2006. "Look who's working now," National Economic Trends, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Apr.
  26. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2005. "Hard 'core' inflation," Monetary Trends, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Feb.
  27. Kristie M. Engemann & Leora Friedberg & Michael T. Owyang, 2005. "Keep your résumé current," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jan, pages 4-9.
  28. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2005. "So much for that merit raise: the link between wages and appearance," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Apr, pages 10-11.
  29. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2005. "Survey says..," National Economic Trends, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Sep.
  30. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2004. "Your current job probably won't be your last," National Economic Trends, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Feb.
  31. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2004. "Can a summer hike cause a surprise fall for mortgage rates?," Monetary Trends, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Sep.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang & Howard J. Wall, 2011. "Where is an oil shock?," Working Papers 2011-016, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

    Cited by:

    1. Morana, Claudio, 2012. "The Oil Price-Macroeconomy Relationship since the Mid- 1980s: A Global Perspective," Energy: Resources and Markets 127423, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
    2. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang & Howard J. Wall, 2014. "Where Is An Oil Shock?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2), pages 169-185, March.
    3. Vipin Arora & Pedro Gomis-Porqueras & Shuping Shi, 2011. "Testing for Explosive Behaviour in Relative Inflation Measures: Implications for Monetary Policy," Monash Economics Working Papers 37-11, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    4. Laura Cueppers & Dieter Smeets, 2015. "How Do Oil Price Changes Affect German Stock Returns?," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 5(1), pages 321-334.
    5. Mohamad B. Karaki, 2018. "Asymmetries In The Responses Of Regional Job Flows To Oil Price Shocks," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(3), pages 1827-1845, July.
    6. Arlan Brucal & Michael J. Roberts, 2018. "Not All Regions Are Alike: Evaluating the Effect of Oil Price Shocks on Local and Aggregate Economies," Working Papers 2018-4, University of Hawaii Economic Research Organization, University of Hawaii at Manoa.
    7. Monica Dudian & Mihaela Mosora & Cosmin Mosora & Stefanija Birova, 2017. "Oil Price and Economic Resilience. Romania’s Case," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 9(2), pages 1-8, February.
    8. Nnaemeka Vincent Emodi & Kyung-Jin Boo, 2015. "Sustainable Energy Development in Nigeria: Overcoming Energy Poverty," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 5(2), pages 580-597.

  2. Kristie M. Engemann & Kevin L. Kliesen & Michael T. Owyang, 2010. "Do oil shocks drive business cycles? some U.S. and international evidence," Working Papers 2010-007, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

    Cited by:

    1. Mehmet Balcilar & Reneé van Eyden & Josine Uwilingiye & Rangan Gupta, 2014. "The impact of oil price on South African GDP growth: A Bayesian Markov Switching-VAR analysis," Working Papers 201470, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    2. Johannes Pfeiffer, 2017. "Fossil Resources and Climate Change – The Green Paradox and Resource Market Power Revisited in General Equilibrium," ifo Beiträge zur Wirtschaftsforschung, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, number 77.
    3. Jean-Baptiste Hasse & Quentin Lajaunie, 2020. "Does the Yield Curve Signal Recessions? New Evidence from an International Panel Data Analysis," AMSE Working Papers 2013, Aix-Marseille School of Economics, France.
    4. Cunado, Juncal & Jo, Soojin & Perez de Gracia, Fernando, 2015. "Macroeconomic impacts of oil price shocks in Asian economies," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 86(C), pages 867-879.
    5. Luciana Juvenal & Ivan Petrella, 2012. "Speculation in the oil market," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    6. Cunado, Juncal & Perez de Gracia, Fernando, 2014. "Oil price shocks and stock market returns: Evidence for some European countries," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 365-377.
    7. Morana, Claudio, 2012. "The Oil Price-Macroeconomy Relationship since the Mid- 1980s: A Global Perspective," Energy: Resources and Markets 127423, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM).
    8. Luiggi Donayre & Neil A. Wilmot, 2016. "The Asymmetric Effects of Oil Price Shocks on the Canadian Economy," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 6(2), pages 167-182.
    9. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang & Howard J. Wall, 2014. "Where Is An Oil Shock?," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2), pages 169-185, March.
    10. Nermeen Harb & Mamdouh Abdelmoula M. Abdelsalam, 2019. "Effect Of Oil Prices On Stock Markets: Evidence From New Generation Of Star Model," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 71(3), pages 466-482, July.
    11. Alexey Mikhaylov, 2019. "Oil and Gas Budget Revenues in Russia after Crisis in 2015," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 9(2), pages 375-380.
    12. Trabelsi, Nader, 2017. "Asymmetric tail dependence between oil price shocks and sectors of Saudi Arabia System," The Journal of Economic Asymmetries, Elsevier, vol. 16(C), pages 26-41.
    13. Jean-Baptiste Hasse & Quentin Lajaunie, 2020. "Does the Yield Curve Signal Recessions? New Evidence from an International Panel Data Analysis," Working Papers halshs-02549044, HAL.
    14. Vasilios Plakandaras & Juncal Cunado & Rangan Gupta & Mark E. Wohar, 2016. "Do Leading Indicators Forecast U.S. Recessions? A Nonlinear Re-Evaluation Using Historical Data," Working Papers 201685, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    15. Juncal Cunado & Soojin Jo & Fernando Perez de Gracia, 2015. "Revisiting the Macroeconomic Impact of Oil Shocks in Asian Economies," Staff Working Papers 15-23, Bank of Canada.
    16. James D. Hamilton, 2013. "Oil prices, exhaustible resources and economic growth," Chapters, in: Roger Fouquet (ed.),Handbook on Energy and Climate Change, chapter 1, pages 29-63, Edward Elgar Publishing.
    17. Daniel, Betty & Hafner, Christian & Manner, Hans & Simar, Leopold, 2017. "Asymmetries in Business Cycles and the Role of Oil Prices," LIDAM Discussion Papers ISBA 2017010, Université catholique de Louvain, Institute of Statistics, Biostatistics and Actuarial Sciences (ISBA).
    18. Edward S. Knotek & Saeed Zaman, 2020. "Asymmetric Responses of Consumer Spending to Energy Prices: A Threshold VAR Approach," Working Papers 202017, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 16 Jun 2020.
    19. Nima Ebrahimi & Craig Pirrong, 2020. "Oil jump risk," Journal of Futures Markets, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 40(8), pages 1282-1311, August.
    20. Dhaoui, Abderrazak & Khraief, Naceur, 2014. "Empirical linkage between oil price and stock market returns and volatility: Evidence from international developed markets," Economics Discussion Papers 2014-12, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    21. Gross, Marco, 2011. "Corporate bond spreads and real activity in the euro area - Least Angle Regression forecasting and the probability of the recession," Working Paper Series 1286, European Central Bank.
    22. Fornari, Fabio & Lemke, Wolfgang, 2010. "Predicting recession probabilities with financial variables over multiple horizons," Working Paper Series 1255, European Central Bank.
    23. Hamilton, James D., 2011. "Nonlinearities And The Macroeconomic Effects Of Oil Prices," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 15(S3), pages 364-378, November.
    24. Pönkä, Harri, 2015. "Real oil prices and the international sign predictability of stock returns," MPRA Paper 68330, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    25. Dhaoui, Abderrazak & Audi, Mohamed & Ouled Ahmed Ben Ali, Raja, 2015. "Revising empirical linkages between direction of Canadian stock price index movement and Oil supply and demand shocks: Artificial neural network and support vector machines approaches," MPRA Paper 66029, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    26. James D. Hamilton, 2012. "Oil Prices, Exhaustible Resources, and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 17759, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    27. Raheem, Ibrahim D. & Bello, Ajide Kazeem & Agboola, Yusuf H., 2020. "A new insight into oil price-inflation nexus," Resources Policy, Elsevier, vol. 68(C).
    28. Jochen H. F. Güntner & Katharina Linsbauer, 2018. "The Effects of Oil Supply and Demand Shocks on U.S. Consumer Sentiment," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 50(7), pages 1617-1644, October.
    29. Alexey Yurievich Mikhaylov, 2018. "Pricing in Oil Market and Using Probit Model for Analysis of Stock Market Effects," International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy, Econjournals, vol. 8(2), pages 69-73.
    30. Kuhanathan Ano Sujithan & Sanvi Avouyi-Dovi & Lyes Koliai, 2013. "Does Monetary Policy Respond to Commodity Price Shocks?," Post-Print hal-01511915, HAL.
    31. Andrea Gatto & Francesco Busato, 2019. "Defining, measuring and ranking energy vulnerability," CREATES Research Papers 2019-01, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    32. Omotosho, Babatunde S., 2019. "Business Cycle Fluctuations in Nigeria: Some Insights from an Estimated DSGE Model," MPRA Paper 98351, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    33. Orlowski, Lucjan T., 2017. "Volatility of commodity futures prices and market-implied inflation expectations," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 51(C), pages 133-141.
    34. Dhaoui, Abderrazak & Saidi, Youssef, 2015. "Oil supply and demand shocks and stock price: Evidence for some OECD countries," MPRA Paper 63556, University Library of Munich, Germany.

  3. Kristie M. Engemann & Howard J. Wall, 2009. "The effects of recessions across demographic groups," Working Papers 2009-052, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

    Cited by:

    1. Alfonso ARPAIA & Nicola CURCI, "undated". "EU labour market behaviour during the Great Recession," Working Papers wp2010-6, Department of the Treasury, Ministry of the Economy and of Finance.
    2. David Cutler & Wei Huang & Adriana Lleras-Muney, 2014. "When Does Education Matter? The Protective Effect of Education for Cohorts Graduating in Bad Times," NBER Working Papers 20156, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Cynthia Bansak & Mary E. Graham & Allan A. Zebedee, 2012. "Business Cycles and Gender Diversification: An Analysis of Establishment-Level Gender Dissimilarity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 561-565, May.
    4. Michael Owyang & Jeremy Piger & Howard Wall, 2011. "Discordant City Employment Cycles," ERSA conference papers ersa11p1525, European Regional Science Association.
    5. Julie L. Hotchkiss & Robert E. Moore, 2018. "Some Like It Hot: Assessing Longer-Term Labor Market Benefits from a High-Pressure Economy," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2018-1, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, revised 01 Oct 2018.
    6. Jeffrey Thompson & Timothy M. Smeeding, 2010. "Recent Trends in the Distribution of Income: Labor, Wealth and More Complete Measures of Well Being," Working Papers wp225, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    7. Wilkinson, Lindsay R. & Schafer, Markus H. & Wilkinson, Renae, 2020. "How painful is a recession? An assessment of two future-oriented buffering mechanisms," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 255(C).
    8. Sahin, Aysegül & Jonathan L. Willis, 2011. "Employment patterns during the recovery: Who are getting the jobs and why?," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Q III, pages 5-34.
    9. Latif, Ehsan, 2014. "The impact of recession on drinking and smoking behaviours in Canada," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 43-56.
    10. Wall, Howard J., 2013. "The employment cycles of neighboring cities," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(1), pages 177-185.
    11. Kaswengi, Joseph & Diallo, Mbaye Fall, 2015. "Consumer choice of store brands across store formats: A panel data analysis under crisis periods," Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, Elsevier, vol. 23(C), pages 70-76.
    12. Bharadwaj, Prashant & Bietenbeck, Jan & Lundborg, Petter & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2019. "Birth weight and vulnerability to a macroeconomic crisis," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 136-144.

  4. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2007. "Whatever happened to the business cycle? a Bayesian analysis of jobless recoveries," Working Papers 2007-013, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

    Cited by:

    1. R. Jason Faberman, 2008. "Job flows, jobless recoveries, and the Great Moderation," Working Papers 08-11, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    2. Kevin x.d. Huang & Jie Chen & Zhe Li & Jianfei Sun, 2014. "Financial Conditions and Slow Recoveries," Vanderbilt University Department of Economics Working Papers 14-00004, Vanderbilt University Department of Economics.
    3. Barnett, Alina & Mumtaz, Haroon & Theodoridis, Konstantinos, 2014. "Forecasting UK GDP growth and inflation under structural change. A comparison of models with time-varying parameters," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 129-143.

Articles

  1. Engemann, Kristie M. & Owyang, Michael T., 2010. "Whatever Happened To The Business Cycle? A Bayesian Analysis Of Jobless Recoveries," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 14(5), pages 709-726, November.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Kristie M. Engemann & Howard J. Wall, 2010. "The effects of recessions across demographic groups," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 92(Jan), pages 1-26.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Michelle T. Armesto & Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2010. "Forecasting with mixed frequencies," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 92(Nov), pages 521-536.

    Cited by:

    1. Galvão, Ana Beatriz, 2013. "Changes in predictive ability with mixed frequency data," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 395-410.
    2. Winkelried, Diego, 2012. "Predicting quarterly aggregates with monthly indicators," Working Papers 2012-023, Banco Central de Reserva del Perú.
    3. Luci Alessi & Eric Ghysels & Luca Onorante & Richard Peach & Simon M. Potter, 2014. "Central bank macroeconomic forecasting during the global financial crisis: the European Central Bank and Federal Reserve Bank of New York experiences," Staff Reports 680, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    4. Michal Franta & David Havrlant & Marek Rusnák, 2016. "Forecasting Czech GDP Using Mixed-Frequency Data Models," Journal of Business Cycle Research, Springer;Centre for International Research on Economic Tendency Surveys (CIRET), vol. 12(2), pages 165-185, December.
    5. P�r Österholm, 2014. "Survey data and short-term forecasts of Swedish GDP growth," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(2), pages 135-139, January.
    6. Harchaoui, Tarek M. & Janssen, Robert V., 2018. "How can big data enhance the timeliness of official statistics?," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 225-234.
    7. Edward S. Knotek & Saeed Zaman, 2017. "Financial Nowcasts and Their Usefulness in Macroeconomic Forecasting," Working Papers (Old Series) 1702, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, revised 17 Mar 2017.
    8. Gustavo Adolfo HERNANDEZ DIAZ & Margarita MARÍN JARAMILLO, 2016. "Pronóstico del Consumo Privado: Usando datos de alta frecuencia para el pronóstico de variables de baja frecuencia," Archivos de Economía 014828, Departamento Nacional de Planeación.
    9. Baumeister, Christiane & Guérin, Pierre & Kilian, Lutz, 2015. "Do high-frequency financial data help forecast oil prices? The MIDAS touch at work," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 238-252.
    10. Turhan, Ibrahim M. & Sensoy, Ahmet & Hacihasanoglu, Erk, 2015. "Shaping the manufacturing industry performance: MIDAS approach," Chaos, Solitons & Fractals, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 286-290.
    11. Valadkhani, Abbas & Smyth, Russell, 2017. "How do daily changes in oil prices affect US monthly industrial output?," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(C), pages 83-90.
    12. Zhang, Yue-Jun & Wang, Jin-Li, 2019. "Do high-frequency stock market data help forecast crude oil prices? Evidence from the MIDAS models," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 78(C), pages 192-201.
    13. Marie Bessec & Othman Bouabdallah, 2015. "Forecasting GDP over the Business Cycle in a Multi-Frequency and Data-Rich Environment," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 77(3), pages 360-384, June.
    14. Duarte, Cláudia & Rodrigues, Paulo M.M. & Rua, António, 2017. "A mixed frequency approach to the forecasting of private consumption with ATM/POS data," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 33(1), pages 61-75.
    15. Heiner Mikosch & Laura Solanko, 2019. "Forecasting Quarterly Russian GDP Growth with Mixed-Frequency Data," Russian Journal of Money and Finance, Bank of Russia, vol. 78(1), pages 19-35, March.
    16. Jung, Alexander, 2017. "Forecasting broad money velocity," The North American Journal of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 421-432.
    17. J. Isaac Miller, 2014. "Simple Robust Tests for the Specification of High-Frequency Predictors of a Low-Frequency Series," Working Papers 1412, Department of Economics, University of Missouri.
    18. Raul Ibarra & Luis M. Gomez-Zamudio, 2017. "Are Daily Financial Data Useful for Forecasting GDP? Evidence from Mexico," Economía Journal, The Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association - LACEA, vol. 0(Spring 20), pages 173-203, April.
    19. Zhao, Xin & Han, Meng & Ding, Lili & Kang, Wanglin, 2018. "Usefulness of economic and energy data at different frequencies for carbon price forecasting in the EU ETS," Applied Energy, Elsevier, vol. 216(C), pages 132-141.
    20. Ghysels, Eric & Miller, J. Isaac, 2013. "Testing for Cointegration with Temporally Aggregated and Mixed-frequency Time Series," CEPR Discussion Papers 9654, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    21. Bangwayo-Skeete, Prosper F. & Skeete, Ryan W., 2015. "Can Google data improve the forecasting performance of tourist arrivals? Mixed-data sampling approach," Tourism Management, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 454-464.
    22. Han, Meng & Ding, Lili & Zhao, Xin & Kang, Wanglin, 2019. "Forecasting carbon prices in the Shenzhen market, China: The role of mixed-frequency factors," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 171(C), pages 69-76.
    23. Lee, Chien-Chiang & Chen, Mei-Ping & Chang, Chi-Hung, 2014. "Industry co-movement and cross-listing: Do home country factors matter?," Japan and the World Economy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 96-110.
    24. Jiang, Yu & Guo, Yongji & Zhang, Yihao, 2017. "Forecasting China's GDP growth using dynamic factors and mixed-frequency data," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 132-138.
    25. Gorgi, Paolo & Koopman, Siem Jan & Li, Mengheng, 2019. "Forecasting economic time series using score-driven dynamic models with mixed-data sampling," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 1735-1747.
    26. Kvedaras, Virmantas & Zemlys, Vaidotas, 2012. "Testing the functional constraints on parameters in regressions with variables of different frequency," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 116(2), pages 250-254.
    27. Guy P. Nason & Ben Powell & Duncan Elliott & Paul A. Smith, 2017. "Should we sample a time series more frequently?: decision support via multirate spectrum estimation," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 180(2), pages 353-407, February.
    28. Stefan Neuwirth, 2017. "Time-varying mixed frequency forecasting: A real-time experiment," KOF Working papers 17-430, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
    29. Heinisch, Katja & Lindner, Axel, 2018. "For how long do IMF forecasts of world economic growth stay up-to-date?," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics, pages 1-6.
    30. Neville Francis, 2012. "The Low-Frequency Impact of Daily Monetary Policy Shock," 2012 Meeting Papers 198, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    31. Sampi Bravo,James Robert Ezequiel & Jooste,Charl, 2020. "Nowcasting Economic Activity in Times of COVID-19 : An Approximation from the Google Community Mobility Report," Policy Research Working Paper Series 9247, The World Bank.
    32. Ball, Ryan & Ghysels, Eric, 2017. "Automated Earnings Forecasts:- Beat Analysts or Combine and Conquer?," CEPR Discussion Papers 12179, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    33. Kanas, Angelos & Molyneux, Philip, 2020. "Do measures of systemic risk predict U.S. corporate bond default rates?," International Review of Financial Analysis, Elsevier, vol. 71(C).
    34. Pan, Zhiyuan & Wang, Qing & Wang, Yudong & Yang, Li, 2018. "Forecasting U.S. real GDP using oil prices: A time-varying parameter MIDAS model," Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 177-187.
    35. Nikolaos Antonakakis & David Gabauer & Rangan Gupta, 2018. "International Monetary Policy Spillovers: Evidence from a TVP-VAR," Working Papers 201806, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    36. Kamini Solanki & Yudhvir Seetharam, 2014. "Is consumer confidence an indicator of JSE performance?," Contemporary Economics, University of Economics and Human Sciences in Warsaw., vol. 8(3), September.
    37. Laura D´Amato & Lorena Garegnani & Emilio Blanco, 2015. "GDP Nowcasting: Assessing business cycle conditions in Argentina," BCRA Working Paper Series 201569, Central Bank of Argentina, Economic Research Department.
    38. Ghysels, Eric & Qian, Hang, 2019. "Estimating MIDAS regressions via OLS with polynomial parameter profiling," Econometrics and Statistics, Elsevier, vol. 9(C), pages 1-16.
    39. Deschamps, Bruno & Ioannidis, Christos & Ka, Kook, 2020. "High-frequency credit spread information and macroeconomic forecast revision," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 358-372.
    40. Schumacher, Christian, 2016. "A comparison of MIDAS and bridge equations," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 257-270.
    41. Mikosch, Heiner & Solanko, Laura, 2017. "Should one follow movements in the oil price or in money supply? Forecasting quarterly GDP growth in Russia with higher-frequency indicators," BOFIT Discussion Papers 19/2017, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.
    42. Guay, Alain & Maurin, Alain, 2015. "Disaggregation methods based on MIDAS regression," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 50(C), pages 123-129.
    43. Cláudia Duarte & Sónia Cabral, 2016. "Nowcasting Portuguese tourism exports," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles and Banco de Portugal Economic Studies, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    44. Trujillo-Barrera, Andres & Pennings, Joost M.E., 2013. "Energy and Food Commodity Prices Linkage: An Examination with Mixed-Frequency Data," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150465, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    45. Zhang, Jin & Li, Pujiang & Zhao, Guochang, 2018. "Is power generation really the gold measure of the Chinese economy? A conceptual and empirical assessment," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 211-216.
    46. Roy Verbaan & Wilko Bolt & Carin van der Cruijsen, 2017. "Using debit card payments data for nowcasting Dutch household consumption," DNB Working Papers 571, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.

  4. Kristie M. Engemann & Howard J. Wall, 2009. "A journal ranking for the ambitious economist," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 91(May), pages 127-140.

    Cited by:

    1. Pantelis Kalaitzidakis & Theofanis P. Mamuneas & Thanasis Stengos, 2011. "An updated ranking of academic journals in economics," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 44(4), pages 1525-1538, November.
    2. Klaus Wohlrabe, 2016. "Taking the Temperature: A Meta-Ranking of Economics Journals," CESifo Working Paper Series 5726, CESifo.
    3. Morris G. Danielson & Jean L. Heck, 2014. "Voting with Their Feet: In Which Journals Do the Most Prolific Finance Researchers Publish?," Financial Management, Financial Management Association International, vol. 43(1), pages 1-27, March.
    4. Yushan Hu & Ben Li, 2017. "The Production Economics of The Economics Production," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 924, Boston College Department of Economics.
    5. Kosnik, Lea-Rachel, 2015. "What have economists been doing for the last 50 years? A text analysis of published academic research from 1960-2010," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 9, pages 1-38.
    6. Martin Ravallion & Adam Wagstaff, 2011. "On measuring scholarly influence by citations," Scientometrics, Springer;Akadémiai Kiadó, vol. 88(1), pages 321-337, July.
    7. Mark J. McCabe & Christopher M. Snyder, 2015. "Does Online Availability Increase Citations? Theory and Evidence from a Panel of Economics and Business Journals," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 97(1), pages 144-165, March.
    8. Mikko Packalen & Jay Bhattacharya, 2015. "Neophilia Ranking of Scientific Journals," NBER Working Papers 21579, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Wohlrabe, Klaus, 2016. "Taking the Temperature: A Meta-Ranking of Economics Journals," MPRA Paper 68933, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. G�nther Fink & Margaret McConnell & Sebastian Vollmer, 2014. "Testing for heterogeneous treatment effects in experimental data: false discovery risks and correction procedures," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(1), pages 44-57, January.
    11. Leeves, Gareth D. & Poon, Wai Ching, 2015. "Chinese universities economic research output 2000–2010," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(C), pages 1-9.
    12. David L. Anderson & John Tressler, 2010. "The Merits of Using Citation-Based Journal Weighting Schemes to Measure Research Performance in Economics: The Case of New Zealand," Working Papers in Economics 10/03, University of Waikato.
    13. Walters, William H., 2014. "Do Article Influence scores overestimate the citation impact of social science journals in subfields that are related to higher-impact natural science disciplines?," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 421-430.
    14. Winkler, Anne E. & Levin, Sharon & Stephan, Paula & Glänzel, Wolfgang, 2011. "Publishing Trends in Economics across Colleges and Universities, 1991-2007," IZA Discussion Papers 6082, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    15. Libman, A., 2011. "Journals as a Selection Tool in Economics," Journal of the New Economic Association, New Economic Association, issue 12, pages 174-177.
    16. Kube, Roland & Löschel, Andreas & Mertens, Henrik & Requate, Till, 2018. "Research trends in environmental and resource economics: Insights from four decades of JEEM," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 92(C), pages 433-464.
    17. Howard J. Wall, 2009. "Journal rankings in economics: handle with care," Working Papers 2009-014, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.

  5. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang & Sarah Zubairy, 2008. "A primer on the empirical identification of government spending shocks," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 90(Mar), pages 117-132.

    Cited by:

    1. Weonho Yang & Jan Fidrmuc & Sugata Ghosh, 2012. "Macroeconomic Effects of Government Spending Shocks: New Evidence Using Natural Distaster Relief in Korea," CEDI Discussion Paper Series 12-05, Centre for Economic Development and Institutions(CEDI), Brunel University.
    2. Anderson, Emily & Inoue, Atsushi & Rossi, Barbara, 2013. "Heterogeneous Consumers and Fiscal Policy Shocks," CEPR Discussion Papers 9631, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Gerald A. Carlino & Robert P. Inman, 2014. "Macro fiscal policy in economic unions: states as agents," Working Papers 14-20, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    4. Weonho Yang & Jan Fidrmuc & Sugata Ghosh, 2012. "Macroeconomic Effects of Government Spending Shocks: New Evidence Using Natural Disaster Relief in Korea," CESifo Working Paper Series 3943, CESifo.
    5. Michael T. Owyang & Sarah Zubairy, 2009. "Who benefits from increased government spending? a state-level analysis," Working Papers 2009-006, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    6. Craig, Steven G. & Hoang, Edward C., 2011. "State government response to income fluctuations: Consumption, insurance, and capital expenditures," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(4), pages 343-351, July.

  6. Riccardo DiCecio & Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang & Christopher H. Wheeler, 2008. "Changing trends in the labor force: a survey," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 90(Jan), pages 47-62.

    Cited by:

    1. Beghin, John C. & Meade, Birgit Gisela Saager & Rosen, Stacey, 2014. "A Consistent Food Demand Framework for International Food Security Assessment," 2014: Food, Resources and Conflict, December 7-9, 2014. San Diego, California 197167, International Agricultural Trade Research Consortium.
    2. Lahiri, Kajal & Song, Jae & Wixon, Bernard, 2008. "A model of Social Security Disability Insurance using matched SIPP/Administrative data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 145(1-2), pages 4-20, July.
    3. Lena Edlund & Cecilia Machado & Maria Sviatschi, 2016. "Bright Minds, Big Rent: Gentrification and the Rising Returns to Skill," Working Papers 16-36, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    4. David J G Slusky, 2017. "Significant Placebo Results in Difference-in-Differences Analysis: The Case of the ACA’s Parental Mandate," Eastern Economic Journal, Palgrave Macmillan;Eastern Economic Association, vol. 43(4), pages 580-603, September.
    5. Willem Van Zandweghe, 2012. "Interpreting the recent decline in labor force participation," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, vol. 97(Q I), pages 5-34.
    6. Christopher J. Erceg & Andrew T. Levin, 2014. "Labor Force Participation and Monetary Policy in the Wake of the Great Recession," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 46(S2), pages 3-49, October.
    7. Ross Richardson & Lia Pacelli & Ambra Poggi & Matteo G. Richiardi, 2016. "Female labour force projections using microsimulation for six EU countries," LABORatorio R. Revelli Working Papers Series 148, LABORatorio R. Revelli, Centre for Employment Studies.
    8. Yuanyuan Deng & Hugo Benítez-Silva, 2015. "Medicare Expenditures, Social Security Reform, and the Labor Force Participation of Older Americans," Working Papers wp330, University of Michigan, Michigan Retirement Research Center.
    9. Silvio Contessi & Li Li, 2013. "From \\"man-cession\\" to \\"he-covery\\": same old, same old," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    10. Wang, Tong & Hennessy, David & Park, Seong, 2014. "Veterinary Supply, Gender and Practice Location Choices in the United States, 1990-2010," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 170211, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    11. Paraskevi Salamaliki & Ioannis Venetis, 2014. "Smooth transition trends and labor force participation rates in the United States," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 46(2), pages 629-652, March.
    12. Kristie M. Engemann & Howard J. Wall, 2009. "The effects of recessions across demographic groups," Working Papers 2009-052, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    13. Landajo, Manuel & Presno, María José, 2010. "Nonparametric pseudo-Lagrange multiplier stationarity testing," MPRA Paper 25659, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    14. Saridakis, George & Marlow, Susan & Storey, David J., 2014. "Do different factors explain male and female self-employment rates?," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 345-362.
    15. Joseph S. Falzone, 2017. "Labor Force Participation and Educational Attainment in the United States," International Advances in Economic Research, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 23(3), pages 321-332, August.

  7. Kristie M. Engemann & Michael T. Owyang, 2006. "Social changes lead married women into labor force," The Regional Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Apr, pages 10-11.

    Cited by:

    1. Hiroyuki Kikuchi & Yuko Odagiri & Yumiko Ohya & Yutaka Nakanishi & Teruichi Shimomitsu & Töres Theorell & Shigeru Inoue, 2020. "Association of overtime work hours with various stress responses in 59,021 Japanese workers: Retrospective cross-sectional study," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(3), pages 1-22, March.

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 5 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-BEC: Business Economics (4) 2007-06-23 2010-03-20 2011-06-18 2011-07-02
  2. NEP-ENE: Energy Economics (2) 2010-03-20 2011-07-02
  3. NEP-MAC: Macroeconomics (2) 2007-06-23 2010-03-20
  4. NEP-CBA: Central Banking (1) 2010-03-20
  5. NEP-LAB: Labour Economics (1) 2009-10-31

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