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Segregación ocupacional y diferencias salariales por género en España: 1995-2002

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  • Sara de la Rica

Abstract

Este artículo presenta nueva evidencia sobre el impacto de la segregación ocupacional en la explicación de las diferencias salariales por género en España en 1995 y 2002. Se utilizan datos de la Encuesta de Estructura Salarial (EES-95 y EES-2002), con las que se puede identificar el establecimiento al que cada trabajador pertenece, así como identificar el salario base y los complementos salariales como componentes fundamentales del salario total. El primer resultado derivado del trabajo es que al comparar hombres y mujeres de la misma empresa y ocupación, así como de la misma edad, nivel educativo y tipo de contrato, las diferencias salariales totales ascienden a un 14% a favor de los hombres tanto en 1995 como en el 2002. Estas diferencias se originan especialmente en los complementos salariales, dado que las diferencias en el salario base no superan el 5%, mientras que el diferencial en los complementos salariales asciende al 31% a favor de los hombres. Si aceptamos que hombres y mujeres que trabajan en la misma empresa y ocupación realizan tareas muy parecidas, podríamos concluir que no se cumple el principio de “mismo pago por mismo trabajo”, dada la diferencia salarial encontrada. El segundo resultado del trabajo radica en la importancia de la segregación ocupacional: la segregación de mujeres en empresas y ocupaciones dentro de una misma empresa de baja remuneración contribuye de manera significativa a la explicación de los diferenciales salariales encontrados, sobre todo en términos de menor salario base, y por tanto de categorías profesionales más bajas.

Suggested Citation

  • Sara de la Rica, 2007. "Segregación ocupacional y diferencias salariales por género en España: 1995-2002," Working Papers 2007-35, FEDEA.
  • Handle: RePEc:fda:fdaddt:2007-35
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