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Wages and the Bargaining Regime in a Corporist Setting: The Netherlands

Listed author(s):
  • Joop Hartog

    ()

    (University of Amsterdam)

  • Edwin Leuven

    (University of Amsterdam)

  • Coen N. Teulings

    ()

    (SEO, University of Amsterdam)

In a corporatist country, of which the Netherlands is an example, wages should not be distinguished by union membership status, but by the bargaining regime. Four bargaining regimes can be distinguished: (i) company level bargaining, (ii) industry level bargaining, (iii) mandatory extension of an industry agreement, and (iv) no collective bargaining. Acknowledging firms' bargaining regime, we find small differences between the four regimes, and certainly no distinction between “covered” and “uncovered” firms. This discussion paper resulted in a publication in the European Journal of Political Economy (2002), 18(2), 317-331.

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Paper provided by Tinbergen Institute in its series Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers with number 00-013/3.

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Date of creation: 23 Feb 2000
Handle: RePEc:tin:wpaper:20000013
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  1. Murphy, Kevin M & Welch, Finis, 1990. "Empirical Age-Earnings Profiles," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(2), pages 202-229, April.
  2. Robinson, Chris & Tomes, Nigel, 1984. "Union Wage Differentials in the Public and Private Sectors: A Simultaneous Equations Specification," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 2(1), pages 106-127, January.
  3. Dickens, William T & Lang, Kevin, 1985. "A Test of Dual Labor Market Theory," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 75(4), pages 792-805, September.
  4. van den Berg, Annette & Groot, Wim, 1992. "Union Membership in the Netherlands: A Cross-Sectional Analysis," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 17(4), pages 537-564.
  5. Brown, Charles & Medoff, James, 1989. "The Employer Size-Wage Effect," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(5), pages 1027-1059, October.
  6. Stewart, Mark B, 1987. "Collective Bargaining Arrangements, Closed Shops and Relative Pay," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 97(385), pages 140-156, March.
  7. Christie, Virginia, 1992. "Union Wage Effects and the Probability of Union Membership," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 68(200), pages 43-56, March.
  8. Blau, Francine D & Kahn, Lawrence M, 1996. "International Differences in Male Wage Inequality: Institutions versus Market Forces," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 104(4), pages 791-836, August.
  9. William T. Dickens & Kevin Lang, 1985. "Testing Dual Labor Market Theory: A Reconsideration of the Evidence," NBER Working Papers 1670, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Robinson, Chris, 1989. "The Joint Determination of Union Status and Union Wage Effects: Some Tests of Alternative Models," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(3), pages 639-667, June.
  11. Michael Bruno & Jeffrey D. Sachs, 1985. "Economics of Worldwide Stagflation," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number brun85-1, November.
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