IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/etd/wpaper/021.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The State, Determinants, and Consequences of Skills Mismatch in the Ethiopian Labour Market

Author

Listed:
  • Berhe Mekonnen Beyene and

    () (Consultant | Ethiopian Development Research Institute)

  • Tsegay Gebrekidan Tekleselassie

    () (Ethiopian Development Research Institute)

Abstract

The study analyses the incidence of labour market mismatch, identifies the correlates of skills mismatch that shed light on the causes of the problem, and investigates its consequences on well-being. It is the first attempt to formally study skills mismatch in the urban labour market in Ethiopia. Using several indicators of qualification mismatch, we find that about a quarter of employees are mismatched with over-qualification being the more prevalent problem. In comport with findings for developed countries, our analysis reveals overqualified worker report lower job satisfaction compared to the well-matched. We also find that skill-mismatch, particularly over education lowers wages; while education is positively and significantly associated with wage, overeducated workers earn less than those well-matched for their level of education. This implies a wage penalty associated with over-qualification even in a developing country context. Our study highlights that labour market mismatch is not only a phenomenon of the developed world but also the developing countries. Hence, skills mismatch needs to be a key aspect of labour market policy making along with issues of decent and productive work.

Suggested Citation

  • Berhe Mekonnen Beyene and & Tsegay Gebrekidan Tekleselassie, 2018. "The State, Determinants, and Consequences of Skills Mismatch in the Ethiopian Labour Market," Working Papers 021, Ethiopian Development Research Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:etd:wpaper:021
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.edri.org.et/Resources/Working_Papers/EDRI_WP021_Skills_Mismatch_in_the_Ethiopian_Labour_Market.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. McGuinness, Seamus & Sloane, Peter J., 2011. "Labour market mismatch among UK graduates: An analysis using REFLEX data," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 130-145, February.
    2. Sparreboom, Theo. & Staneva, Anita., 2015. "Structural change, employment and education in Mozambique," ILO Working Papers 994875813402676, International Labour Organization.
    3. Hartog, Joop, 2000. "Over-education and earnings: where are we, where should we go?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 131-147, April.
    4. Belfield, Clive, 2010. "Over-education: What influence does the workplace have?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(2), pages 236-245, April.
    5. Nordin, Martin & Persson, Inga & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2010. "Education-occupation mismatch: Is there an income penalty?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(6), pages 1047-1059, December.
    6. Bauer, Thomas K., 2002. "Educational mismatch and wages: a panel analysis," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(3), pages 221-229, June.
    7. McGoldrick, KimMarie & Robst, John, 1996. "Gender Differences in Overeducation: A Test of the Theory of Differential Overqualification," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 86(2), pages 280-284, May.
    8. Sattinger, Michael, 1993. "Assignment Models of the Distribution of Earnings," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 31(2), pages 831-880, June.
    9. Kiker, B. F. & Santos, Maria C. & de Oliveira, M. Mendes, 1997. "Overeducation and undereducation: Evidence for Portugal," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 16(2), pages 111-125, April.
    10. Clark, Andrew E. & Oswald, Andrew J., 1996. "Satisfaction and comparison income," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(3), pages 359-381, September.
    11. Clive Belfield & R. D. F. Harris, 2002. "How well do theories of job matching explain variations in job satisfaction across education levels? Evidence for UK graduates," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(5), pages 535-548.
    12. Richard R. Verdugo & Naomi Turner Verdugo, 1989. "The Impact of Surplus Schooling on Earnings: Some Additional Findings," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 24(4), pages 629-643.
    13. Groot, Wim & Maassen van den Brink, Henriette, 2000. "Overeducation in the labor market: a meta-analysis," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 149-158, April.
    14. Gaaitzen de Vries & Marcel Timmer & Klaas de Vries, 2015. "Structural Transformation in Africa: Static Gains, Dynamic Losses," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 51(6), pages 674-688, June.
    15. Mendes de Oliveira, M. & Santos, M. C. & Kiker, B. F., 2000. "The role of human capital and technological change in overeducation," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 199-206, April.
    16. Parvinder Kler, 2005. "Graduate overeducation in Australia: A comparison of the mean and objective methods," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 47-72.
    17. Girum Abebe & Stefano Caria & Marcel Fafchamps & Paolo Falco & Simon Franklin & Simon Quinn, 2016. "Curse of Anonymity or Tyranny of Distance? The Impacts of Job-Search Support in Urban Ethiopia," NBER Working Papers 22409, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Olga Kupets, 2015. "Skill mismatch and overeducation in transition economies," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 224-224, December.
    19. Andrew E. Clark, 1996. "Job Satisfaction in Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 34(2), pages 189-217, June.
    20. Michael J. Handel & Alexandria Valerio & Maria Laura Sánchez Puerta, 2016. "Accounting for Mismatch in Low- and Middle-Income Countries," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 24906.
    21. Mehta, Aashish & Felipe, Jesus & Quising, Pilipinas & Camingue, Sheila, 2011. "Overeducation in developing economies: How can we test for it, and what does it mean?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(6), pages 1334-1347.
    22. Vieira, José A. Cabral, 2005. "Skill mismatches and job satisfaction," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 89(1), pages 39-47, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Skills mismatch; education; labour market; Ethiopia; welfare;

    JEL classification:

    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:etd:wpaper:021. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dagmawi Atnafu) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Dagmawi Atnafu to update the entry or send us the correct email address. General contact details of provider: http://www.edri.org.et .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.